The Miller-Motte College Cary, NC campus is currently not accepting enrollments.

 

 

Miller-Motte College Campus






Miller-Motte College

Cary, North Carolina

 

 

School Catalog - 2019 Volume II
April 5, 2019 - July 5, 2019

Effective May 6, 2019

 

 

School Name

Miller-Motte College
 

School Address

2205 Walnut Street
Cary, NC 27518

Phone: (919)532-7171
Fax: (919)532-7151
http://www.miller-motte.edu/
 

General Disclaimer

This catalog is an official publication of Miller-Motte College and is subject to revision at any time.  The school reserves the right to change, withdraw, or supplement this catalog as it deems necessary or appropriate in its policies and operating procedures, curricula, class schedules, course content, training, equipment, tuition and fees, faculty, and staff. Students are individually responsible for being aware of information contained in the catalog and any amendments thereto.  Failure to read and comply with school regulations will not exempt students from penalties that they may incur.  Students are advised to read and fully understand the rules, regulations, and policies stated herein and to retain this catalog for use as a reference.   Students are encouraged to visit the student portal for updates to this catalog.
 

Accreditation Statements

As of January 18, 2018 Miller-Motte College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC), as a branch campus of Platt College – Tulsa, 3801 S Sheridan, Tulsa, OK  74145, 918-663-9000.

ACCSC is located at 2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 302, Arlington, VA  22201.  703-247-4212. 

The Miller-Motte College Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB).

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
25400 U.S. Highway 19 North, Suite 158
Clearwater, FL 33763
Phone: 727-210-2350
www.caahep.org


The Miller-Motte College Surgical Technology Associate Degree program at the Cary campus is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Accreditation Review Council on Education in Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (ARC/STSA).  The program has been placed on Probationary Accreditation as of November 16, 2018.

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
25400 U.S. Highway 19 North, Suite 158
Clearwater, FL 33763
Phone: 727-210-2350
www.caahep.org

 

State Approval/Licensure

Miller-Motte College is licensed by the North Carolina Community College System, with approval from the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges. The North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges is not an accrediting agency.

The College is approved by the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina to conduct associate of applied science degrees in Medical Assisting and Surgical Technology.

Approved for the training of Veterans and eligible persons.

Eligible to provide the training services under the Comprehensive Vocational Rehabilitation Act.

Board approved by the North Carolina Board of Massage & Bodywork Therapy; License #00030.

Licensed by the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art; License #SC199.

Certified in Microdermabrasion by the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art.

Students may contact the Executive Director if they wish to view campus/programmatic accreditation or licensure documents.

 

Academic Calendar

Term Dates

                  2019

                  2020

Track I

Track II

Track I

Track II

Winter Term

Jan 7 – Mar 17

Feb 11-Apr 21

Jan 13-Mar 22

Feb 17-Apr 26

Spring Term

Mar 18– May 26

Apr 22-Jun 30

Mar 23-May 31

Apr 27-Jul 5

Summer Term

May 27- Aug 4

Jul 1-Sept 8

Jun 1-Aug 9

Jul 6-Sept 13

Late Summer Term

Aug 5 – Oct 13

Sept 9-Nov 17

Aug 10-Oct 18

Sept 14-Nov 22

Fall Term

Oct 14 – Dec 22

Nov 18-Feb 16

Oct 19-Dec 27

Nov 23-Feb 14
















 

Calendar Dates:

         2019

         2020

Classes Begin Winter Mod A

January 7

January 13

Continuing Student Drop/Add

January 13

January 19

Faculty In-Service* (MLK Day)

January 21

January 20

New Student Extended Drop/Add

January 20

January 26

End of Winter Mod A

February 10

February 16

Classes Begin Winter Mod B

February 11

February 17

Continuing Student Drop/Add

February 17

February 23

New Student Extended Drop/Add

February 24

March 1

End of Winter Mod B

March 17

March 22

Classes Begin Spring Mod A

March 18

March 23

Continuing Student Drop/Add

March 24

March 29

New Student Extended Drop/Add

March 31

April 5

Spring Holiday*

April 19

April 10

End of Spring Mod A

April 21

April 26

Classes Begin Spring Mod B

April 22

April 27

Continuing Student Drop/Add

April 28

May 3

New Student Extended Drop/Add

May 5

May 10

Faculty In-Service*

May 10

May 15

Memorial Day* **

May 27

May 25

Classes End Spring  Mod B

May 26

May 31

Classes Begin Summer Mod A

May 27

June 1

Continuing Student Drop/Add

June 2

June 7

New Student Extended Drop/Add

June 9

June 14

End of Summer Mod A

June 30

July 5

Classes Begin Summer Mod B

July 1

July 6

Independence Day Holiday* **

July 4

July 3

Continuing Student Drop/Add

July 7

July 12

New Student Extended Drop/Add

July 14

July 19

Faculty In-Service*

July 19

July 24

Classes End Summer Mod B

August 4

August 9























































Classes Begin Late Summer Mod A

August 5

August 10

Continuing Student Drop/Add

August 11

August 16

New Student Extended Drop/Add

August 18

August 23

Labor Day* ** 

September 2

September 7

End of Late Summer Mod A

September 8

September 13

Classes Begin Late Summer Mod B

September 9

September 14

Continuing Student Drop/Add

September 15

September 20

Faculty In-Service*

October 4

October 2

New Student Extended Drop/Add

September 22

September 27

Classes End Late Summer Mod B 

October 13

October 18

Classes Begin Fall Mod A

October 14

October 19

Continuing Student Drop/Add

October 20

October 25

New Student Extended Drop/Add

October 27

November 1

End of Fall Mod A

November 17

November 22

Classes Begin Fall Mod B 

November 18

November 23

Thanksgiving Recess* ** 

November 28-29

November 26-27

Continuing Student Drop/Add

November 24

November 29

New Student Extended Drop/Add

December 1

December 6

Classes End Fall Mod B 

December 22

December 27

Winter Break* # 

December 23-January 12, 2020

December 28 – January 10, 2021






























 



*No classes.
**School and offices closed.
# Campus clinics may remain open during class break periods to enable students to work required clinic hours.  Students should check with their campus for clinic dates.
 

 

About School

 

Mission Statement and Objectives

Miller-Motte College prepares students for career-focused employment by delivering relevant career training.

Objectives
1.    To provide an educational environment that promotes the relationship between career preparation and employment opportunities.
2.    To recruit and retain qualified instructors who are effective in the classroom and knowledgeable of current industry trends.
3.    To graduate students who are prepared to enter their chosen career.
4.    To assist graduates in becoming gainfully employed in their chosen career field.
5.    To maintain an organizational model that is responsive to its constituents.
 

History

Miller-Motte Colleges (MMC or Miller-Motte) and Miller-Motte Technical Colleges (MMTC or Miller-Motte) comprise the Miller-Motte family of schools which are part of Ancora Education.  For over three-quarters of a century, Miller-Motte has been a reputable leader in private career education.  Judge Leon Motte founded the school in 1916 in Wilmington, North Carolina. The school provided the local legal community with a small training center for courtroom stenographers.  In 1979, Richard and Sharon Craig acquired the school and relocated it to South College Road across the street from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

In 1987, a branch campus was opened in Clarksville, Tennessee. Due to expansion, a new facility was built, and in 1989, the Clarksville campus moved to a new location at 1820 Business Park Drive. In 1989, the Clarksville Campus applied for, and was granted, stand-alone accreditation through the Association of Independent Colleges and Schools. During this time, the Clarksville campus was re-designated as the main campus, and the Wilmington Campus became a branch campus.

In 1929, Phillips Business College, then known as Phillips Secretarial School, was founded in Lynchburg, Virginia by the late Marjorie Green Phillips. In 1954, Virginia Commercial College, which had been established in 1909, merged with Phillips Business College. The college continued to operate under the Phillips Business College name until the late 1990's when, through a change in ownership, the school became a member of the Miller-Motte family of colleges.

In 1998, the stock of Miller-Motte Business College, Inc. was purchased by Delta Educational Systems, Inc. In November 2000, Miller-Motte Business College changed its name to Miller-Motte Technical College. The Charleston branch of Miller-Motte Technical College was opened in December 2000. In October of 2003, to accommodate the growing student population, the Wilmington campus moved to 5000 Market Street.  In November 2006, the campuses located in North Carolina changed their names to Miller-Motte College. Over the years, the school opened additional locations in North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia.

During the past 20 years, the colleges have added several key programs that have served the needs of the business and health care communities and provided even better employment opportunities for their graduates. Miller-Motte College and Miller-Motte Technical College are in a continual process of reviewing, assessing, and revising their curriculum in order to keep pace with improvements in technology and the increasing needs of business and industry.

In 2018, the Miller-Motte campuses in Clarksville, TN and Lynchburg, VA were closed.

In January 2018, Miller-Motte College was purchased by STVT-AAI Education Inc., dba Ancora Education and received accreditation by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC).    

 

Facilities

Miller-Motte College – Cary at 2205 Walnut Street includes labs and clinic rooms designed with the equipment, supplies, and storage necessary to support the teaching, observation, practical application, and assessment of student learning outcomes. The campus provides secure, high-speed wireless connectivity. In addition, students can access the school’s library electronic resources via the computer lab, library, or a borrowed Chromebook in our Student Success Center, as well as through home computers or smart phones. Medical laboratories are arranged to provide simulated working environment.  Medical equipment is reflective of work environments and provides students with the opportunity to learn on equipment they will encounter in the workplace. Our Massage Therapy and Esthetics Technology clinic rooms and waiting area are designed to look and feel like a spa.

The building is comprised of approximately 28,000 square feet and supports the educational programs by providing both classroom and laboratory settings.  The campus includes four general use classrooms, one combination classroom/computer lab, one computer lab, a Medical Assisting classroom/lab, a Surgical Technology classroom/lab, two Massage Therapy lab classrooms, a Massage Therapy classroom/lab, a Student Success Center, and Library/Computer lab. The clinic hallway includes eight Massage Therapy treatment rooms, one couples massage room, six Esthetics treatment rooms, a hydrotherapy room and a clean laundry storage room. The clinic waiting area and a student clinic documentation area is located at the front of the building. The laundry room with two commercial washers and dryers is located across the hall at the end of the clinic hallway. A 1000+ square foot student lounge includes drink and snack machines and the Director of Student Services’ office. Along the main hallway, there are five program director classrooms and a women’s and men’s bathroom. The building includes ten other offices, an instructor workstation area with computers and phones, a conference room, a print shop, a file room, two server rooms, two storage rooms, a career services area with four cubicles, and an admissions area with 12 cubicles.

Miller-Motte College - Cary is a branch campus of Platt College – Tulsa, 3801 S Sheridan, Tulsa, OK  74145 918-663-9000.
 

Class Size

The school with maintain a proper ratio between teachers and students to allow adequate attention to each individual in both theory class and the laboratory.  The student-teacher ratio will generally not exceed 30:1 in theory classes and 12:1 in laboratory classes.

The student-teacher ratio for the Surgical Technology program will generally not exceed 10:1 in laboratory classes.  The student-teacher ratio for the Esthetics Technology program will generally not exceed 20:1 for all lecture and clinic courses.  The student-teacher ratio for the Massage Therapy program will generally not exceed 16:1.
 

Tuition Bond

The Cary Campus maintains a Tuition Guaranty Bond equal to or greater than the maximum amount of prepaid unearned tuition held existing at any time during the most recent fiscal year. The Cary Campus will fulfill its contractual obligations to its students. The Bond is held by the Clerk of the Superior Court of Wake County with a copy for student review maintained at the office of the Executive Director.
 

Admissions Requirements & Procedures

Miller-Motte College seeks students who have a strong desire for practical career preparation in their chosen fields and who have the ability to achieve academic success.  Applications for admission are accepted throughout the year.  Refer to the academic calendar for the exact starting dates.  Information about enrollment in Miller-Motte College may be obtained from any of the school’s Admissions Representatives.

General Admissions Requirements
The admission procedure requires an exchange of information between the applicant and an Admissions Representative either on campus or by remote representatives.  These representatives conduct a personal interview with each applicant, during which the representative discusses the school’s educational programs in relation to the applicant’s career preferences, training needs, and individual motivation. This interview plays an important role in helping the  applicant determine if the programs offered at the campus will help them achieve their career goals and if they will move forward with enrollment. High school applicants are encouraged to be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. 

In addition, applicants who plan to enter a program must meet the following admission requirements: 
  • Complete the SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Indicator (see Assessments section for further information). Applicants in all programs (except clock hour and non-Title IV programs) must score a minimum score of 60% on the Technical Competency sections.  Applicants who do not score the minimum score on the Technical Competency section are required to complete the Technology for Success (ORN0001) supplemental student orientation and achieve a minimum score of 60% on the Technology for Success assessment.
  • Applicants enrolling into the Surgical Technology at the Miller-Motte College campus: Complete the Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam (SLE).
    • Must meet a minimum score of 18 or higher.
    • If an applicant fails to meet the necessary score for admission, the applicant may be re-tested using an alternate test form and taking the test timed as before. There is no limit to the number of times an applicant may be re-tested.
    • Entrance evaluation may be waived for applicants holding an Associate Degree or higher.

International applicants interested in enrolling should contact the school to determine if the school is approved for enrollment based on the applicant’s immigration status.

Applicants enrolling in short-term career training programs may have different admissions requirements.

Prior Education Requirement
Each applicant must have earned one of the following educational credentials from a Miller-Motte College recognized organization: a high school diploma or equivalent or a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.

Prior to starting classes, applicants will be required to submit proof of high school graduation or a recognized equivalency certificate (GED) to the school by providing the school with a copy of the official transcript confirming graduation or GED completion.

Programmatic Admissions Policies
For a student enrolling in the Personal Fitness Trainer Certification program who does not have a high school diploma or its equivalent, the student may satisfy the Prior Education Requirement by passing the Wonderlic Basic Skills Test (WBST). Students must obtain a minimum score of 193 on the Verbal section, 214 on the Quantitative section, OR a minimum of 207 for the composite score. If the student does not pass on the first attempt, the student may have one additional attempt to earn a passing score.

 

Acceptance

All material submitted to Miller-Motte College becomes the property of the school.  To be officially accepted, a student must satisfy all conditions of regular enrollment that are identified in writing to the student. These conditions include, but may not be limited to, (a) sufficient proof that the student has a high school diploma or its equivalent, and (b) is not in default in repayment of any student loan indebtedness. For certain programs, regular enrollment may also require the student’s passing enhanced entrance testing or enrolling in additional courses.

In an effort to maintain a safe educational and working environment for students and staff, the school reserves the right to not accept applicants who are known to have/disclose certain types of criminal convictions in their backgrounds. Admitted students who are discovered to have misrepresented their criminal conviction history in the application process may be subject to immediate dismissal. Similarly, students who commit certain types of crimes while enrolled may be subject to immediate dismissal. The school reserves the right to conduct criminal background checks on applicants and students in circumstances deemed appropriate.

 

Background Checks

Students may be required to undergo criminal background checks before they can be placed in clinical rotations, start externships/internships, take professional licensing exams, apply for industry certification, or obtain a permit needed to work within their chosen career field. Students with a criminal background are responsible for inquiring with the appropriate agencies about current requirements prior to enrolling in the program of their choice. Students who have prior criminal records may be denied an opportunity to complete clinical rotations, internship/externship, the opportunity to take professional licensing exams, obtain permits/certification, or obtain employment within their chosen field. 

 

Drug Testing

Contracted externship/practicum sites may require students to undergo a drug test prior to beginning an externship/practicum experience. Students who refuse to submit may be unable to continue in their academic programs and may also be ineligible for employment in their career fields.
 

Vaccinations

The school does not require that students provide proof of vaccinations as a condition of enrollment or graduation. However, externship or clinical sites, particularly hospitals and other medical facilities, may have additional vaccination requirements.  These requirements may vary by externship or clinical site but typically include the following:
  • Tuberculosis test (PPD) or chest X-ray with report administered no more than one year prior to initiation of training
  • Documentation of two rubeola, one rubella and one mumps vaccinations or positive titers
  • Documentation of two varicella vaccines or positive varicella serology titer
  • Evidence of Hepatitis B vaccination or declination as required by the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard
  • Tetanus (within past 10 years)
  • Flu vaccination (if externing between October-March)
  • Urine drug screening

Students are required to comply with any additional vaccination requirements of these sites and provide proof of vaccination to the school.  If the student does not provide vaccination records for an externship or clinical site that requires proof, the school will work with the student to find another site where possible but this may lead to the inability to complete the externship element. The Education Department will review any additional criteria of an externship site.

 

Assessments

As part of the initial enrollment process, the school requires completion of the SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Indicator entrance assessment. The SmarterMeasure assessment measures student readiness to engage in postsecondary learning based on non-cognitive indicators of success. The school uses the results of the assessment to determine the type of support that will be most beneficial to the student throughout the program of study. Applicants are required to complete the Technical Competency, Technical Knowledge and Learning Styles sections prior to acceptance. Applicants in all programs (except clock hour and non-Title IV programs) must score a minimum score of 60% on the Technical Competency sections.  Applicants who do not score the minimum score on the Technical Competency section are required to complete Technology for Success (ORN001) supplemental orientation and score 60% on the Technology for Success assessment.

During orientation the student advisor/ program director/hybrid teaching assistant or student resource coordinator will schedule a meeting with each student to review the results of the SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Indicator to discuss the results and develop success strategies based upon the SmarterMeasure assessment results.

For applicants enrolling into the Surgical Technology program at the Miller-Motte College campus, the school also requires another entrance examination, the Wonderlic Scholastic Level Examination (SLE) prior to enrollment. The school uses results from the SLE to evaluate each student’s qualification for admission. The Director of Education may waive the SLE based on documentation of prior academic work. An applicant who has previously completed a degree will not be required to take the SLE if the applicant shows evidence of degree completion in the form of an official transcript prior to enrollment. An applicant who does not provide evidence of having completed a degree will be required to take the SLE.
 

Equal Educational Opportunity

a. Miller-Motte College declares and affirms a policy of equal employment opportunity, equal educational opportunity, and nondiscrimination in the provision of educational services to the public.  The school will make all decisions regarding recruitment, hiring, promotion, and all other terms and conditions of employment without discrimination on grounds of race, color, creed or religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetic information or other factors which cannot lawfully be the basis for an employment decision.

b. Miller-Motte College reaffirms its policy of administering all of its educational programs and related supporting services and benefits in a manner which does not discriminate because of a student’s or prospective student’s race, color, creed or religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or other characteristics which cannot lawfully be the basis for provision of such services.

c. Miller-Motte College adheres to the provisions of the following federal laws, in each case as they have been amended to date: (a) the Higher Education Act of 1965, (b) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and (c) the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.  Inquiries concerning the application of these laws and their implementing regulations may be referred to the Executive Director.
 

Student Disability Accommodation

This Student Request for Accommodations Policy and Procedure applies to all qualified students with a disability for purposes of obtaining reasonable accommodations at educational campuses owned and operated by Ancora Education.

This accommodations policy applies to all types of students - undergraduate, degree-seeking and non-degree seeking, full-time and part-time, and students pursuing a program of study through online or ground instructional delivery. Only students who identify themselves as having a disability and seek accommodation using these procedures are eligible.  Students who have been accepted but have not yet enrolled may also access this policy through the applicable campus's catalog.  Applicants seeking to matriculate to a program of study at educational campuses owned and operated by Ancora Education are also covered by this policy for accommodations needed in the admissions process.

This policy defines the process for eligible students to seek reasonable accommodations in any of the programs and activities offered by campuses owned and operated by Ancora Education.  Students engaged in academic work off -site (such as internships or externships for course credit) should contact his or her Director of Education to seek reasonable accommodations.  (The ability to accommodate a student with a disability, as required by federal and state law, should be a pre-condition to any business, agency, or organization that wants to participate in an internship or externship agreement with the Ancora Education.) The Director of Education will serve as a consultant and information source for students arranging accommodations.

II.   Purpose
This policy and procedures enable Ancora Education to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which require reasonable accommodations made for qualified students with disabilities and prohibit Ancora Education from excluding such students from, or denying them the benefits of, its programs or activities.

III.  Definitions
The following terms are applied by Ancora Education in accordance with and by using the definitions supplied by federal law and regulations, which are summarized here.

Accommodations
are defined as any reasonable adjustment required for a student to have equal access to the programs and activities, inside or outside the classroom.   Accommodations do not include: 
  • Substantial modifications to academic standards;
  • Modification or adjustment of requirements essential to any program of instruction, program or activity, or essential to any directly related licensing requirement; or
  • Modifications or adjustments that result in undue hardship, considering the nature, cost, and impact of the accommodation, and other factors.

Disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. 

IV.  Policy
It is the policy of Ancora Education to provide qualified students who have disabilities with reasonable accommodation based upon relevant law, the academic program’s educational standards, and sound ethical practice in disability services.

Decisions about whether a student is a qualified student with a disability and what constitutes reasonable accommodation are made by the Director of Education in consultation with the Program Director and Executive Director.  Accommodations are considered on a case by case as well as a course by course (or program or activity) basis.

V.  Procedure for Requesting Accommodations

        A..  Documentation of Disability and Need for Accommodation

Students who may wish to document a disability include those entering a program for the first time or returning after a period of non-enrollment, who have a known disability; those experiencing educational difficulty who are referred by a faculty member or campus official for consultation regarding the possibility of disability; and those whose health and/or physical abilities are altered during their educational tenure resulting in disability (permanent or temporary).

Students may always choose whether or not they want to identify themselves as having a disability, but students who want an accommodation must identify themselves by completing an official disability accommodations request form and providing documentation to support the request for disability accommodations.  Copies of this form may be obtained by contacting the Director of Education.  For non-matriculated students, an official disability accommodations request form can be obtained by contacting an Admissions Representative. 

The student assumes full responsibility for providing all diagnostic information to sufficiently support the existence of disability and the need for reasonable accommodation. Other supporting materials, including a previously utilized Individualized Education Plan, would be helpful in assessing a student’s request for disability accommodation.  An accommodation is not needed if the student would still have meaningful access to the program, service or activity without it.

The student is responsible for completing the request for accommodations paperwork, including the official disability accommodations request form and diagnostic information to sufficiently support the existence of disability and the need for reasonable accommodation.  The Director of Education at each campus is responsible for deciding whether a disability or need for accommodation(s) has been adequately documented.

        B.  Timing

Students should make accommodation requests as far in advance of the relevant course, entrance assessment, activity or program, to allow for appropriate consideration and planning.  Because the reasonableness of any individual accommodation request can vary substantially depending upon a student's current course load, schedule, or course content, accommodation requests must be reviewed by the Director of Education each term of enrollment.

When possible, students entering the a program of study for the first time should submit information related to disability at least six weeks prior to enrollment so that reasonable accommodation can be arranged and delivered prior to the start of the term. 

        C.  Accommodation Determinations

Having provided sufficient evidence of a disability and need for accommodation, a student may make official requests for accommodation by submitting an official disability accommodations request form and supporting materials. The Director of Education will consider the information (documentation) provided by the student, consult with faculty and/or other campus officials as needed, and determine what constitutes reasonable accommodation(s) for the student’s disability.  (See Section III for a definition of accommodation.)

The Director of Education will identify a list of approved accommodations in accordance with the manifestations of the disability, a copy of which will be shared with the student.  For academic accommodations, following review and approval at the start of each term of enrollment, the Director of Education will prepare individual letters for each professor summarizing the approved accommodations relevant to his/her course. These letters will be delivered to the student and appropriate instructors through email.  Faculty and other campus officials then are required to provide reasonable accommodation(s) in accordance with the Director of Education’s letter(s).  If a faculty member or other campus official does not agree to an accommodation request, the student should seek the assistance of the Director of Education.

VI.  Confidential Handling of Disability Records
All information submitted to or developed by the campus related to the diagnosis, documentation, or accommodation of a disability is considered confidential. Information regarding the student's disability obtained from medical examinations or appropriate post-admissions inquiries will be considered confidential and will be shared with others within the university on a need-to-know basis.  Other staff may be provided access to all disability records and may arrange access for other authorized officials in the event of an emergency or other unusual necessity. The Chief Compliance Officer for Ancora Education may collect accommodation data for reporting purposes as well as quality control.

VII.  Appealing Accommodation Determinations
Students may petition for a review of disability accommodations determinations under the following ADA/Rehabilitation Act Grievance Procedure:

        A..  Purpose

This is the grievance procedure mandated under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (the ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (the Rehabilitation Act).  The ADA and the Rehabilitation Act prohibit excluding people from participation in educational programs or activities based on their disability, from denying them the benefits of such programs or activities, and from discriminating against such individuals.  The ADA and Rehabilitation Act also require a process for grievances relating to disability-based discrimination.

        B.  Scope

Any student who believes that he or she has been discriminated against on the basis of his or her disability, or has been denied access or accommodations required by, law may make a complaint under this procedure.  Specifically, students may make a complaint about: 

  • A requested service or accommodation, including appeals of determinations regarding  accommodations;
  • Inaccessibility of a program or activity;
  • Harassment on the basis of disability in violation of policy; or
  • Any other alleged violation of the ADA or the Rehabilitation Act.  

This is not the procedure for students initially seeking accommodations; students who have a disability that require accommodations should contact the Director of Education.  This is also not the procedure for misconduct allegations by students against other students or student organizations; the Student Code of Conduct outlines the process for disciplining students.   

        C.  Making a Complaint

                    1.  Disability Accommodation Determination Challenges; Requests for Review

A student who has been denied a requested accommodation or otherwise disagrees with a Disability Services accommodation decision is encouraged – but not required – to discuss his or her concern with the Director of Education.  A conversation may resolve a disagreement quickly.

                     2.  Informal Review by Executive Director

A student who disagrees in any way with a decision regarding a request for accommodation may seek review of a decision under this procedure by contacting the Executive Director.  Requests for review of a decision should be made promptly and in any event within 10 days of the accommodation decision being made, unless the student can show good cause for the delay. Time-sensitive requests should be made as far in advance as possible.

If the Executive Director feels that the disagreement can be resolved informally, the Executive Director will try to do so, working with the student and the Director of Education and any other necessary individuals (such as a faculty member, for example).  If informal resolution is ineffective or impractical, the Executive Director will refer the matter to the Office of the Chief Academic Officer for investigation and review.

                    3.  Next Level Review: Office of the Chief Academic Officer

The Office of the Chief Academic Officer’s staff will review the determination of the disability accommodation request and investigate the matter as needed.  This includes requests for information from the instructor or director of the relevant program or activity for which the student is seeking an accommodation, where necessary.  The Office of the Chief Academic staff will present his or her findings to the Chief Academic Officer, who will decide whether any changes to the original decision should be made.

If the Chief Academic Officer decides that an additional or different accommodation should be afforded, the Director of Education will issue a (revised) accommodation letter(s) to the student and any other necessary parties (such as the instructor).  If the Chief Academic Officer upholds the initial accommodation determination, he or she will notify the student, the Director of Education and the Executive Director, and the matter will be closed. 

The review and determination of any appeal to the Chief Academic Officer will be made within 60 days of the review being sought.

VIII.  Protection from Retaliation
Ancora Education prohibits any form of retaliation against a person who participates in a grievance process.  Retaliation can take many forms, ranging from students harassing or ostracizing another student to a faculty member excluding a student from an educational activity.  Ancora Education will immediately address any retaliatory actions that occur.

IX.  Interpretation
Questions concerning the application of this policy and the application of the ADA or the Rehabilitation Act to students may be made in writing to the Executive Director.

 

Transfer of credit

Students who wish to transfer credits from another institution must submit transcripts from all postsecondary schools attended. An applicant may be granted transfer credit for courses taken at other schools that are determined to substantively address a consistent set of learning objectives compared with courses offered at Ancora Education campuses. Transfer of credit evaluations will be conducted using the following guidelines:
  • An official transcript of the student's coursework must be furnished directly by the institution where the coursework was completed before any application for transfer credits can be accepted.
  • The campus may request additional information such as course descriptions or syllabi if there is question on the comparability of program content to the program in which the student will enroll. The student is responsible for providing any requested additional information.
  • The student may be required to demonstrate through testing any hands-on competencies before transfer credit is accepted for courses where such competencies are required.
  • Credits must have been earned in courses offered at institutions accredited by an agency recognized by either the U.S. Department of Education or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation at the time the credit was earned.
  • A grade of "C" or higher must be earned in each course completed to be eligible for transfer from a non-Ancora owned school.
  • A grade of "D" or higher must be earned in each course completed to be eligible for transfer from a commonly owned Ancora Education school.
  • Credits will be evaluated on a course by course basis. In most instances, core requirements must be transferred within seven (7) year of completion. No timeframe restrictions will be imposed on general education coursework.
  • Courses taken at institutions operating on quarter systems will be evaluated as direct equivalent credits into quarter credit programs. Those transferred from institutions operating on a semester basis to quarter hour institutions are multiplied by one and one half to convert them to quarter credit hours.
  • In the case of a clock hour program, any course accepted must be at least the same number of clock hours as the course for which it is accepted. The student will also be required to demonstrate through testing any hands-on competencies prior to clock hour course credit being accepted for transfer.
  • Courses that are classified as foundational in nature are not transferable.
  • Transfer credits may impact the student’ schedule, causing the student to be less than full-time, which may impact eligibility for some sources of financial aid.
  • The student will not be charged any fees from the receiving institution for transferring in credits from other institutions. Students are responsible for all fees for obtaining official transcripts and supporting documentation for transfer of credit (Students receiving VA funding, see Proof of Previous Education).
  • In all cases of transfer of credit, Ancora campuses will attempt to avoid excessive loss of previously earned credit and avoid coursework duplication. Any questions about transfer of credits/clock hours should be discussed with the Director of Education, or designee.

Maximum Transfer Credits Accepted (Residency Requirement)
The total credits not earned in residency, including credit by transfer and credit by proficiency testing, may not exceed seventy five percent 75% of the total credit hours (or clock hours for non-credit hour programs) required for the completion of the program of study. 25% of the student’s total credit hours (or clock hours for non-credit hour programs) must be completed in residency.

Coursework Completed at Foreign Institutions
Credit earned at foreign institutions must be externally evaluated by a Ancora Education approved foreign credential evaluator which includes National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) or Association of International Credential Evaluators (AICE) members.

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits and Credentials Earned at Our Campus
Each Ancora Education campus is an accredited campus that is designed to provide the student with vocational career training and is not designed to prepare the student for transfer to other institutions. Acceptance of credits earned at a Ancora Education campus is determined solely by the receiving institution. The campus cannot and does not guarantee credit transfer.

Students wishing to transfer credits should first consult with the Registrar at those institutions concerning acceptance. Ancora Education campuses will provide official transcripts, for a fee, as well as course descriptions by request. Students with outstanding financial obligations will receive only unofficial transcripts, when requested. Accreditation alone does not guarantee credit transfer.

Transfer to Other Ancora Education Campuses
Students in good standing may transfer to another campus location. Transfer students are advised that they will be subject to the minimum residency requirements at the new campus for the program in which they are enrolled.

Procedure: Transfer of Credit
The student is responsible for requesting official transcripts be sent from the prior institution directly to Ancora Education campuses. 

  • All requests for transfer credit must be submitted by the end of the first term of attendance at the school.
  • Since transfer credits impact scheduling and on time completion for students, students who submit official transcripts after the drop/add period in the student’s first term may see changes to scheduling and on time completion.
  • If needed to evaluate comparability of credit, the student may need to request course descriptions and syllabi from the prior institution.
  • The Director of Education, or designee, will review credits based on the guidelines listed above.
  • The Director of Education, or designee, will fill out the Transcript Evaluation Form and notify the student of the credits accepted for transfer.
  • Students wishing to appeal decisions on transfer credit should submit request in writing to the Executive Director to identify reasons for appeal.
    • The Executive Director will request follow-up information as needed for the appeal. 
    • The Executive Director will submit appeal through the Office of the Chief Academic Officer.
    • The Executive Director will notify student of final decision regarding transfer credit. The decision from the Office of the Chief Academic Officer will be final.
    • Once transfer credit is accepted, the student’s tuition will be adjusted based on the number of credits successfully transferred in.
     

    Proficiency Testing

    Ancora Education campuses may offer the opportunity for students to demonstrate proficiency in a course’s content and receive course credit by examination. Both internal and external proficiency credit may be considered.

    Internal proficiency exams are available for certain courses to provide students with the opportunity to earn credit for course material in which they have previous experience. Students must apply to request a proficiency examination for a particular subject. Such a request should be granted if an examination is available and the Director of Education has reason to believe the student’s experience or training warrants such an evaluation. Students who were enrolled in the course beyond the Drop/Add period are not eligible to sit for the exam and a proficiency exam may only be attempted once. A score of 80% or higher is required to earn internal proficiency credit. Students will not be approved to test out of 300 or 400 level courses. Equivalent coursework from another institution may be evaluated for transfer credit per the transfer credit policy.

    External Proficiency credit may also be granted to students who achieve acceptable scores on specific nationally recognized examinations such as Advanced Placement (AP), CLEP, and DANTES. The Director of Education, or designee, will review examinations proposed for credit to determine whether the material covered in the examination matches coursework in the student’s program of study.

    Procedure: Internal Proficiency Examinations
    The student is responsible for requesting the Application for Proficiency Examination from the Office of the Registrar.

    • The student must request the Application for Proficiency Examination form from the Academic Department within the first five weeks of the student’s first term of enrollment.
    • The student will fill out the form, including information as to why the student is requesting a proficiency examination. The campus may deny an application for a student who does not have relevant coursework, certification, or prior work experience.
    • The Director of Education, or designee, will review the request, and if approved, will set up the proficiency examination.
      • Some examinations may be scheduled for a specific day and time.
      • Other examinations may be scheduled to be turned in by a specific day.
      • Some examinations may have a hands-on component that must be proctored.
    • Students wishing to appeal decisions on proficiency examinations should submit the request in writing to the Executive Director to identify reasons for appeal.
      • The Executive Director will request follow-up information as needed for the appeal.
      • The Executive Director will submit appeal through the Office of the Chief Academic Officer.
      • The Executive Director will notify student of final decision regarding proficiency credit. The decision from the Office of the Chief Academic Officer will be final.
    • Once a proficiency examination is passed, the student’s tuition will be adjusted based on the number of credits successfully passed.
     

    Proof of Previous Education for Veterans Affairs Funding

    As a student receiving any Veteran Affairs (VA) funding, it is required to show proof of all previous education obtained for Post-Secondary studies. When applying for VA Benefits, a student must complete a transcript request for all schools previously attended. The school will submit the request at no cost to the student applying, and the student will initially be certified for the first academic term. The school should receive the requested transcript(s) within the students first term to ensure accurate scheduling and timely certification of future charges. Each state has published limitations for how long a student may be certified without receipt and evaluation of prior coursework transcripts.  Students with transcript(s) not received within their State’s Limitation will no longer be certified for future coursework until the school has received the required transcript(s). Exceptions to these limitations must be approved by the State Approving Agency and Executive Director.

     

    Program Length

    The following table lists the expected program length in months for each program:

    Program  Duration in Months
    Esthetics Technology  8
    Massage Therapy  12
    Medical Assisting 18
    Medical Billing and Coding 15
    Medical Clinical Assistant 15
    Personal Fitness Trainer Certification 3
    Surgical Technology  18
     

    Modes of Program Delivery

    Miller-Motte College students may have the opportunity to complete a portion of their programs of study, subject to limits established by the institution’s state licensure and accreditation, through distance education. The following chart outlines each program’s mode(s) of delivery. Refer to the Distance Education section of the catalog for more information.

    C: On-Campus (no courses are available online)
    F: FlexTrack (some courses are available online)
    H: Hybrid (each course is partially on-campus and online)
    O: Online (all courses are available online)

    Program  Modes of Delivery
    Esthetics Technology C
    ICD-10 C
    ICD-10 Hospital C
    Massage Therapy C
    Medical Assisting H
    Medical Assisting Certification Preparation C
    Medical Billing and Coding H
    Medical Clinical Assistant H
    Personal Fitness Trainer Certification C
    Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam Prep C
    Surgical Technology F

     

    Distance Education

    Miller-Motte College students may have the opportunity to complete a portion of their programs of study, subject to limits established by the institution’s state licensure and accreditation, through distance education in Flex Track and hybrid programs of study. Admission requirements for these programs do not vary from admission requirements for programs of study offered entirely on ground. Flex Track programs of study allow students in certain programs of study to complete up to 49 percent of the program through online courses. Hybrid programs of study allow students in certain programs of study to complete greater than 50 percent of their program online.  Hybrid programs contain courses that are a combination of online and face-to-face instruction.  Students are expected to interact with faculty and other students through online discussion boards as well as traditional face-to-face classroom activities.  Students are required to participate in all face-to-face classroom activities and online activities as outlined in the course syllabi. These online courses are specifically designed for the student who will be accessing online courses from a standard home or personal computer.  Students enrolling in online courses should have basic computer competency and skills. All students have access to the same support services regardless of the mode of instructional delivery.  All students have access to library services, academic advising, tutoring, and career services. All distance education/online courses offered by the campus have been deemed as equivalent in content and quality to the same courses offered via traditional, campus-based delivery methods.

    Under certain circumstances, such as a student getting out of sequence with course schedules or courses that may not be offered each term, students enrolled in a campus-based or hybrid program may be required to take online classes to graduate.

    Students participating in Flex Track or hybrid learning programs are expected to complete the online orientation prior to the start of classes.

    Flex Track Programs

    At least 51 percent of the educational program must be taken on campus. The actual percentage of the program offered online will depend on the program selected and the educational delivery for each course.

    Consortium Agreement - Flex Track Learning

    Miller-Motte College has engaged in a third-party distance education consortium agreement with Miller-Motte College, Wilmington, NC.  This agreement enables students enrolled in an eligible program of study to register for online courses that apply toward the academic requirements of certificate, diploma, or degree programs delivered by the home institution. Students taking online courses delivered through this distance education consortium may be comprised of students enrolled at other post-secondary schools, located in other cities and states.

    All distance education/online courses offered by the campus through this consortium agreement have been deemed as equivalent in content and quality to same courses offered through traditional, campus-based delivery methods. Ground students who take online courses offered by the host institution, as a result of the consortium agreement, are limited to taking no more than 49 percent of their program of study in the distance learning format. Students who take an online course are expected to complete an online orientation program to assure readiness to navigate the Learning Management System and to engage in the distance learning activities.

    Every effort is made to provide students with flexibility in class schedules and instructional formats. However, courses that are offered on ground as well as those that are offered online are subject to change without notice.  Students may be required to take a course in either format in order to complete their program of study by their on-time scheduled graduation date.

    Hybrid Learning
    Hybrid learning provides the student with an opportunity for greater flexibility in the learning environment.  Hybrid courses are designed as a combination of online and residential (on-ground classroom) based learning.  Each course has a specific percentage of the course delivered through online delivery.  The following provides general guidance on the distribution of online and residential learning:


    Hour Type               % of Hours Online                % of Hours On-ground
    Lecture                                    75%                                         25%
    Lab                                          25%                                         75%

    Programs of study completed through hybrid distance education are indicated in the Modes of Program Delivery section of the catalog.

    Authentication and Protection of Student Identity
    Each student is provided a unique user name and password for the purpose of authenticating each student’s identity when entering the online classroom. Students are prohibited from providing their passwords and log-ins to any other individual. Furthermore, student identity is authenticated through a series of email, telephone interviews, and/or meetings with the campus Hybrid Teaching Assistant, Student Resource Coordinator or Student Services Coordinator. Each student’s username, password and email address are used to authenticate student identity in order to complete assignments within the Learning Management System. All testing is completed through the Learning Management System and the unique username and password is used to verify student identity.

    The student’s unique username and password is used to verify student identity. Neither the Institution nor Ancora Education will release any student’s username and password to any individual which would violate a student’s rights under the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

    No student is assessed any additional charges or fees associated with the verification/authentication of student identity.

    Technology Specification for Online Courses

    Each student enrolled in an online course(s) or program of study delivered through a distance education consortium is expected to have access to an internet connection, computer hardware and operating software as outlined below. Campus computer labs are available to access online course content and to meet the necessary technology requirements.

    Students Accessing Courses Online
    To have a quality learning experience in your online course(s), your computer must meet or exceed the following specifications:

    ·         Operating System: Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista SP2, Windows 7, Windows 8 Processor: 2 Ghz or higher

    ·         Memory: 4GB or higher

    ·         Hard Drive 80GB of available hard drive space  

    ·         CD/DVD-ROM 16XDirectX 9 compatible sound card Headset or speakers

    ·         Monitor/display video card capable of 1024x768 resolution Internet Connection:High Speed  Cable Or DSL  connection

    ·         Microsoft Office 2013/2016

    ·         Adobe Reader X

    ·         Flash Player (most recent release)

    ·         Internet Explorer 11 or higher  OR

    ·         Mozilla Firefox (most recent release)

    ·         Safari (most recent release—Safari 5)

    ·         Chrome (most recent release)  

     

    Mac Specifications

    ·         Mac OSX 10.9, 10.10, or 10.11 with an Intel processor

    ·         4GB of RAM (minimum)  

    ·         80GB of available hard drive space

    ·         CD/DVD-ROM

    ·         Hardware-accelerated OpenGL graphics card  

    ·         Sound Blaster compatible 16-bit sound card

    ·         Headset or speakers

    ·         Monitor/display video card capable of 1024x768 resolution and 32-bit color

    ·         Internet Connection: High Speed  Cable Or DSL  connection

     

    Note for those who may access courses from your place of employment:  Employers often place restrictions on the content allowed through the organization’s firewall or network security measures.  Such measures may affect your ability to access your online courses from place of employment, or using employer-provided Internet access, and is beyond our ability to predict or control.

    Mobile Devices

    The Student Portal is currently certified to work on iPad and iPhone 4 and 5 devices.  Student portal access is only accessible on Android devices via an online browser, such Chrome.

    Moodle LMS and other third party vendor web applications are not certified to work on mobile devices.  Ancora Education cannot be guaranteed that third party websites and applications will function with your mobile device.

     

    Internet Policy

    Acceptable use Internet access, which connects thousands of computers and millions of subscribers, is available to students and staff. Internet access can promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communications.

    Throughout the educational community, the Internet can be used to educate and inform staff and students. As a learning resource, the Internet is similar to books, magazines, audio recordings, videos, CD-ROMs, and other information media. Student and educators use the Internet to participate in distance learning activities, to ask questions, and consult with experts, to communicate with other students, educators, and individuals, and to locate materials to meet educational needs.

    The Internet also provides access to material that is of no educational value. However, the value of the information found and interaction available outweighs the possibility of locating inappropriate material.

    Internet access is coordinated through a complex association of government agencies, as well as regional and state networks. The smooth operation of the network relies upon the proper conduct of all users who must adhere to strict guidelines. The guidelines, which require efficient, ethical, and legal utilization of the network resources, are provided here so that users are aware of the responsibilities they are about to acquire. In addition, guidelines from other service providers may result in access being suspended and or future access being denied.

    Online Responsibilities

    a. Acceptable use
    The goal of providing Internet access for students and staff is to support education and research consistent with the educational objectives of the School. Transmission of any material in violation of any federal or state regulation is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to, copyrighted material, threatening or obscene material, or material in violation of School Policies.

    b. Privileges

    The use of the Internet is a privilege, not a right, and inappropriate use will result in suspension of that privilege. The equipment, network, and data are the sole property of the School. Therefore, the School retains the right to monitor and or audit any network account at random to insure that the user is adhering to this policy.

    c. Network Etiquette

    While each user has the right to free speech, each user is expected to abide by the School’s accepted code of conduct. Appropriate behavior in telecommunications includes, but is not limited to: 
                i. Being polite 
                ii. Using appropriate conduct. Do not swear, use vulgarities, be abusive, post or publish objectionable material.
                iii. Not engaging in illegal activities. 
                iv. Not revealing personal addresses or phone numbers. 
                v. Recognizing that school electronic mail is not private. Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities or in violation of the acceptable use policy will be reported to appropriate authorities. 
                vi. Not knowingly or carelessly performing an act that will interfere with the normal operation of computers, peripherals, or networks. 
                vii. Respecting copyright laws. All communications and information access via the network are private property unless otherwise stated. 
                viii. Not employing the network for commercial purposes. 
                ix. Not transmitting material that infringes upon the right of others.

    d. Warranty

    The School makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the service it is providing. The School will not be responsible for any damages suffered using the Internet. These include, but are not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, nondeliveries, misdeliveries, service interruptions, or personal errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained via the Internet is at the user’s risk. The School specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through Internet access. 

    e. Security
    Security on a computer system is critical especially when a system involves many users. Proper procedures for logging in and off the network must be followed. If a security problem is identified, the user must notify a system administrator or staff member. The problem may not be demonstrated to other users. Unauthorized use of accounts is strictly prohibited. Attempts to log on the Internet as the network administrator will result in immediate cancellation of user privileges. Users who have a history of problems with other computer systems or who have been identified as a security risk for any other reason will be denied access to the network.

    Users are provided a unique user name and password and are prohibited from providing the user’s name and password to any other individual.

    Student identity, of student participating in online courses/programs, is authenticated through a series of email, telephone interviews, and/or meetings with my Hybrid Teaching Assistant, Student Resource Coordinator or Student Services Coordinator. The students’ username, password and email address are used to authenticate the student’s identity in order to complete assignments within the Learning Management System. All testing is completed through the Learning Management System and the student’s unique username and password is used to verify the student’s identity.

    A student’s unique username and password is used to verify the student identity and neither the Institution nor Ancora Education will release the student’s username and password to any individual which would violate the student’s rights under the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

    f. Vandalism
    Vandalism will result in suspension or cancellation of privileges. Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy the data of another user or to damage other networks. This includes but is not limited to the uploading or creation of computer viruses.

    Refer to the catalog’s Student Code of Conduct section for a list of possible disciplinary sanctions.

     

    Individual Subjects

    An application may be submitted for an individual subject by meeting with an Admissions Representative who will provide the class hours and the days or evenings on which the class meets as well as any prerequisites necessary for particular subjects. Tuition charges for such courses or programs are based on the total number of clock or credit hours scheduled.
     

    Guaranteed Tuition Plan

    Prior to registration all students must meet with financial aid concerning tuition arrangements.  Students in continuous enrollment will be guaranteed the tuition rate and program fee rate in effect at the time of their initial class start date for the remainder of their programs.  Students who leave school for any reason and later return will re-enter at the then current tuition rate and program fee rate in accordance with the current catalog.  This guarantee does not apply to school fees or to books and supplies.
     

    Tuition

    Program  Total Credits Total quarters Tuition per credit Tuition total Program fee per credit Program fee total Registration fee Total program charges (estimate)*
    Medical Assisting 92 7 $290 $26,680 $45 $4,140 $40 $30,860
    Medical Billing and Coding 72 6 $290 $20,880 $45 $3,240 $40 $24,160
    Medical Clinical Assistant 72 6 $290 $20,880 $45 $3,240 $40 $24,160
    Surgical Technology 92 7 $290 $26,680 $55 $5,060 $40 $31,780


    Tuition and fees for the following programs are calculated and charged for the entire program:

    Program  Tuition  Books Registration fee Graduation fee Total program charges
    Esthetics Technology $10,440 $400 $40 $80 $10,960
    Massage Therapy $10,480 $1,900 $40 $80 $12,500



    The following short-term career training courses are not eligible for Title-IV funding and are not within the scope of ACCSC accreditation:

    Program Tuition Total program charges
    ICD-10 $160 $160
    ICD-10 Hospital $160 $160
    Medical Assisting Certification Preparation $210 $210
    Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam Prep $350 $350


    The following short-term career training courses are not eligible for Title-IV funding:

    Program Tuition Total program charges
    Personal Fitness Trainer Certification $1,000 $1,000

     

    OTHER FEES
    Returned Check Fee  $25 per item
     

    Payment Plans

    Tuition, fees, and book supply charges are due and payable at registration. Arrangements may be made for students to pay on a monthly basis the portion of their charges not met by financial aid, scholarships, grants, or other sources. All payment arrangements must be discussed with the Financial Services office prior to registration.

    Students expecting to use loan and grant funds must realize that it is their responsibility to provide all information and documentation necessary to obtain all forms of financial aid by the deadlines imposed by the school and the funding sources. Failure to do so may result in the student being required to provide immediate payment of all applicable charges.

    Working students who are eligible for company-sponsored tuition reimbursement are required to advise and provide appropriate documentation to the Financial Services office.

     

    Textbooks

    Textbooks  are available for purchase at the campus’ online-bookstore and may be in addition to tuition and fees based on your enrollment agreement.

    Appropriate charges for textbooks will be added to your student account. Textbooks purchased by the student become the property of the student. The bookstore is offered as a service to students.  Students are not required to purchase their books at the bookstore or from the school.
     

    Book Provision for Pell Grant Eligible Students

    Effective July 1, 2011, Section 668.164(i) of the regulations under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, requires that a school provide a way for a Federal Pell Grant eligible student to obtain or purchase required books and supplies by the seventh day of a payment period under certain conditions if the student were to have a Title IV credit balance. To satisfy that requirement, this institution provides required books and supplies to students through its online bookstore.

    Students may choose to opt out of this method and obtain books and supplies on their own. To do so the students will need to notify the Business Office prior to the start of the term.

     

    Past Due Accounts

    The student is obligated for tuition, books, and other fees for each period of enrollment. Any student who is delinquent in payments due to the school is subject to exclusion from school privileges including, but not limited to, receiving grade reports, issuing of transcripts, and participation in graduation ceremonies.  Students whose accounts are past due are subject to dismissal and/or referred to a collection agency at the discretion of the school.
     

    Financial Aid

    Financial Aid is available to assist for those who qualify to assist with paying for educational expenses. Financial assistance for qualified students may consist of federal grants and/or loans, which may supplement the student’s own contribution toward completing their educational program. Miller-Motte College offers various financial assistance programs to qualified students including federal, state, local and private programs. Students interested in financial assistance should see the school’s Financial Aid Office.

    Applying for Student Financial Assistance
    All students seeking or applying for financial assistance must meet with a member of the school’s Financial Aid Office staff to complete the application process. During this process, the staff member will provide guidance to the student on how to access the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA, www.fafsa.ed.gov) for completion by the student. The Financial Aid Office staff will provide the student with any other forms necessary to determine the student’s eligibility and complete the application process. It is the student’s responsibility to provide all required documents in order to verify eligibility and process the application in a timely manner.
     

    Grants

    Grants are money awards that do not have to be repaid and are given to students based specifically on financial need.

    The Federal Pell Grant Program Provides federal grants to students who demonstrate calculated financial need. A student's Federal Pell Grant will vary depending upon his/her enrollment status (i.e. full-time, half-time, etc.). The Federal Pell Grant is considered to be the "floor" of the financial aid package, and may be combined with other forms of financial aid. Qualifications for the Federal Pell Grant are determined by the FAFSA.

     

    Loans

    There are several loan programs available. Loans must be repaid. Miller-Motte College is dedicated to finding ways to help students make responsible borrowing decisions and keep students’ debts to manageable levels. Borrow only what you need to cover the cost of tuition, fees and books to ensure you are not taking on more debt than necessary. Remember, you are expected to repay your loan plus interest. Acquiring too much loan debt may be detrimental to your long-term financial health. The less you borrow, the less you will have to repay after graduation.

    A. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program
    Loans made through this program are referred to as Direct Loans, because eligible students and parents borrow directly from the U. S. Department of Education at participating schools. A student must be enrolled at least halftime to be eligible for a loan. Direct Loans include the following:

    • Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans: Subsidized Stafford Loans are available to undergraduate students who display financial need. Financial need is determined by the results of the student’s FAFSA application and the school’s Cost of Attendance. The U. S. Department of Education pays (subsidizes) the interest that accrues on a Direct Subsidized Loan during the time the student is enrolled and during the student’s six month grace period (except for loans first disbursed between July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2014) before repayment on the loan begins.First year dependent and independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $3,500; second year dependent and independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $4,500 and third year dependent and independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $5,500.
    • Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans: Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are available to undergraduate and graduate students. There is no requirement for a student to demonstrate financial need. The student is responsible for paying the interest that accrues on the Direct Unsubsidized Loan.Independent students (and dependent students whose parents are unable to obtain a Direct PLUS loan) may borrow up to an additional $6,000 for first and second year loans, and an additional $7,000 for third year loans. Also, all dependent undergraduate students whose parents do not qualify for a Direct PLUS Loan may borrow up to an additional $2,000 of Direct Unsubsidized Loans.
    • Direct PLUS Loans: Direct PLUS loans are available to the parents, or adoptive parents, of undergraduate students. The PLUS loan allows parents to borrow to assist their dependent children in paying educational expenses.Payments on both principal and interest begin when the loan is fully disbursed. Parents may borrow up to the Cost of Attendance for the student’s program, less any other financial aid received. Federal PLUS loans are subject to credit check. Note: Direct PLUS loans are also available to graduate or professional students.

    Interest Rate Determination
    In August 2013, the Bipartisan Student Loan Certainty Act of 2013 (P.L. 113-28) changed how interest rates are determined on new loans. Interest rates are now linked to the 10-year Treasury rate, plus a fixed margin, and are determined as of July 1st of that year. Interest rates are still fixed for the life of the loan. For example, if the first disbursement of the subsidized or unsubsidized loan is between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018, the interest rate on the loan is fixed at 4.45%. The interest rate for a PLUS loan first disbursed between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018, is 7.00%.

    B. Tuition Options

    Students who have a gap for charges after all other financial aid fund sources have been exhausted and who can demonstrate an ability to pay can be offered extended payment plans through our third party servicer, Tuition Options. Tuition Options plans have a maximum of $8,000 per student with repayment periods of 12 months to 60 months depending on the amount of the loan. Students can see the Financial Services office for more information on this loan program.

    C. Federal Work Study Program
    The Federal Work Study Program (FWS) enables students to earn money for their educational expenses by working in part-time positions. Students are paid hourly for working generally twenty hours per week, depending upon the position. Federal Work Study students may work only in positions related to student services or their programs of study. Applications may be obtained from the Financial Services office and the application must be submitted to the Financial Services office. Students holding a bachelor's degree are eligible to participate in the FWS. Applicants may be required to go through an interview process.

     

    Vocational Rehabilitation

    A student with a physical or mental disability which may be a handicap to employment may be eligible for training services provided through the state government agency for Vocational Rehabilitation.  Students desiring further information should contact the admissions office or call Vocational Rehabilitation directly.
     

    Veterans Education Benefits

    Veterans, children, widows, widowers, and spouses of disabled or deceased veterans, and war orphans are eligible for educational benefits. The required application forms should be obtained, completed, and submitted to the school as far in advance of enrollment as possible, and may be obtained from the Veterans Administration office. Veteran benefits will be governed by the latest policies pertaining to the Veterans Administration regulations.

    Veterans and eligible persons using veterans’ benefits are measured academically based on the satisfactory progress thresholds defined in Standards of Satisfactory Progress (SAP) policy as are all students attending the school. Veterans’ benefits will be suspended for any students who are academically suspended from the school. Refer to the SAP policy section for details of this policy.

     

    Enrollment Certification

    Full-time measurement is 18 clock hours if classroom instruction predominates and 22 clock hours if shop practice predominates.
     

    Financial Aid Eligibility

    Student financial aid applicants must satisfy certain requirements in order to be able to receive and continue to use financial aid.  These requirements include, but are not limited to:
    • Fulfilling of all admission requirements;
    • Submitting of all documentation requested by the school or lender(s) or both;
    • Maintaining satisfactory academic progress in accordance with school policy;
    • Completing “aid specific” requirements, such as entrance and exit loan counseling.  

    In addition, graduating students who received federal student loans must complete exit loan counseling and meet all other graduation requirements before they will be considered a graduate and awarded a degree, diploma, or certificate.  Withdrawing students who used federal student loans must attend exit counseling.

     

    Verification Policy

    Because students sometimes make errors on their application, there is a process for verifying applications and making corrections. The U.S. Department of Education’s Central Processing System (CPS) selects which applications are to be verified, but the school also has the authority to verify additional students. If selected for verification of data submitted on the FAFSA, a copy of both the student’s and parents’ federal Tax Transcript may be required, and must be sent to the Financial Services office, along with required verification worksheets. All documentation must be submitted to the Financial Services office by the verification deadline as stipulated in the Federal Register. Please see the Financial Services office for those specific deadlines. If the required documentation is not submitted the student will not be considered for Federal Pell Grant or Federal student loans. The Financial Services office will notify the student in writing if an award has changed due to verification.

     

    Cancellation and Refund Policy

    The SCHOOL has adopted this Cancellation and Refund Policy for all of its campuses. The reason for a student’s cancellation or withdrawal does not affect how this Cancellation and Refund Policy is applied.

    Applicants who have not visited the school prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three business days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of the school facilities and inspection of equipment where training and services are provided.

    All monies paid by an applicant will be refunded if requested within three days after signing an enrollment agreement and making an initial payment or prior to the end of the drop/add period, whichever is later.

    Written notice of cancellation or withdrawal will take place on the date the letter is postmarked or in a case where the notice is hand carried, it shall occur on the date the notice is delivered to the SCHOOL. The date of acceptance will be the delivery date of the notice of acceptance. If the notice is delivered by mail, it will be the postmarked date of the letter of acceptance. Written notice of cancellation or withdrawal is not required for payment of refund.

    This section of the Cancellation and Refund Policy determines the amount of institutional charges that the SCHOOL has earned, and for which the student must pay, based on the student’s attendance. For purposes of determining the refund or the amount a student owes for the time attended, the last date of attendance is used. A student shall be deemed to have withdrawn when any of the following occurs: (a) the student notifies the SCHOOL of the student’s withdrawal or the actual date of withdraw, (b) the SCHOOL terminates the student’s enrollment as provided in the ENROLLMENT AGREEMENT or (c) the SCHOOL withdraws the student if the student fails to attend as outlined by the attendance policy.

    When such withdrawal occurs prior to the end of the drop/add period of the initial period of enrollment, all tuition, fees, and other charges will be refunded in full.

    If a student ceases attendance or provides notice of cancellation or withdrawal after the start of the period charged, but at or before completion of 60% of the period charged (75% for students attending in Texas), the amount charged for tuition for the completed portion of the course(s) shall not exceed the prorated portion of the total tuition charged for the period arrived at by multiplying the total tuition charged for the period by the ratio of the number of days attended to the total number of days in the period.

    Example: Assume that a student, upon enrollment in a 70 day (10 week) term with the following costs $3,884 for tuition and $540 Program Fee, as specified in the ENROLLMENT AGREEMENT, withdraws after attending 25 days. The pro rata refund to the student would be $2496.86 based on the calculation set forth below:

    $3,884            ÷ 70 Days × 45 Days Remaining          = $2496.86
    Amount charged                                                     Actual Refund Amount

    If the student ceases to attend the SCHOOL after completing 60% of the period charged (75% for students attending in Texas), the student will be charged 100% of the tuition and charges applicable for all courses in the payment/academic period.

     

    Return to Title IV

    SUMMARY OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF 34 CFR 668.22 - TREATMENT OF TITLE  IV AID WHEN A STUDENT  WITHDRAWS

    The law specifies how Miller-Motte College must determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that a student earns if the student withdraws from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Iraq Afghanistan Service Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants, National SMART grants, TEACH Grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS Loans, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs), and Federal Perkins Loans.  Please note that Miller-Motte College does not participate in all of these Title IV programs.

    When a student withdraws during his or her payment period or period of enrollment the amount of Title IV program assistance that a student has earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula.

    If a student did not receive all of the funds that the student earned, the student may be due a Post-withdrawal disbursement. The school may automatically use all or a portion of the student’s Post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition and fees. If the student’s Post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, the school must get the student’s permission before Miller-Motte College can disburse them. The student may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds so that the student doesn’t incur additional debt. However if the student owes a balance to the school, the student may want to authorize the loan disbursement to pay those charges in order to avoid having a payment to the school in addition to the Federal Loan payment.

    While Miller-Motte College will automatically use all or a portion of the student’s Post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition and fees, the school needs the student’s permission to use these funds for any other school charges. If the student did not give permission, the student will be offered the funds.

    There are some Title IV funds that cannot be disbursed to the student once he or she withdraws because of other eligibility requirements. For example, a first-time, first-year undergraduate student who has not completed the first 30 days of his or her program before withdrawing will not receive any Direct Loan funds that the student would have received had the student remained enrolled past the 30th day.

    If a student receives (or the school or parent receives on the student’s behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, the school must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of:

    1. The student’s institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of the student’s funds, or
    2. The entire amount of excess funds.

    The regulations require that the school return Title IV funds to the programs from which the student received aid during the payment period or period of enrollment as applicable, in the following order, up to the net amount disbursed from each source:

    1. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford loans (other than PLUS loans).
    2. Subsidized Direct Stafford loans.
    3. Federal Perkins loans.
    4. Direct PLUS loans.
    5. Federal Pell Grants
    6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) Federal Teach Grants for which a Return is required.
    7. Iraq Afghanistan Service Grant for which a return is required.

    Refunds to the student or any of the Title IV or State programs will be paid within 45 days from the withdrawal/termination date (or any shorter period required by applicable law).

    If the school is not required to return all of the excess funds, the student must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that the student must return, the student (or parent for a PLUS Loan) must repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, the borrower makes scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that the student must return is called a grant overpayment.  Any overpayment as a result of withdrawal will be returned to the Department of Education on the student’s behalf.  However, the return of this overpayment may result in a debt owed to Miller-Motte College. The requirements for Title IV program funds when a student withdraws are separate from the school’s refund policy. Therefore, a student may still owe funds to the school to cover unpaid institutional charges that the school was required to return.

    For purposes of calculating a clock hour return to Title IV that has externships or clinic courses without a defined schedule in CampusVue, the scheduled hours used in the return to Title IV calculation will be determined by using the total contact hours for the course divided by the number of weeks in the externship or clinic courses.  If a daily hour subdivision is needed, to determine a student’s LDA, a week in an externship or clinic course will be divided by 5 days.  This is only in the case a student drops in that course and they need to calculate scheduled hours up to LDA.


    [1] This policy explains the requirements for the return of Title IV funds, which is part of the institutional refund policy. 
     

    Definition of Withdraw and Return to Title IV

    For purposes of calculating Return to Title IV, a student is considered to have withdrawn from a payment period or period of enrollment if—  

    (A)  In the case of a program that is measured in credit hours, the student does not complete all the days in the payment period or period of enrollment that the student was scheduled to complete;

    (B)   In the case of a program that is measured in clock hours, the student does not complete all of the clock hours and weeks of instructional time in the payment period or period of enrollment that the student was scheduled to complete; or

    For a student in a non-term or nonstandard-term program, the student is not scheduled to begin another course within a payment period or period of enrollment for more than 45 calendar days after the end of the module the student ceased attending.

    For answers to questions about Title IV program funds, students should contact one of the school’s Financial Services Officers.

     

    Return to Title IV and Recording of Attendance

    For purposes of calculating Return to Title IV, because this institution voluntarily records attendance in all programs and classes, the school is determined to be a school that is required to take attendance, and as such, uses the student’s last recorded day of attendance in determining the percentage of Title IV aid earned for the payment period or period of enrollment.
     

    Career Services

    The primary purpose of Career Services is to help Miller-Motte College graduates obtain employment in their areas of specialization. Satisfactory completion of program course work by the student is the first step in the employment process. The Career Services office provides specific training in various job-seeking skills through required coursework, optional training sessions, graduation seminars, and individual advisement. The Career Services staff works with each student throughout his or her program to determine areas of employment interest and to explore placement options. This assistance continues through graduation and for alumni. Students are required to provide information that enables them to partner with Career Services in achieving their career goals. Students and graduates are notified of appropriate employment opportunities as they arise. Although it is impossible to guarantee each graduate a job, the Career Services office works to provide job leads and to assist the student in the placement process.
     

    Success and Professional Growth Orientation

    The campus provides a success and professional growth program required for students enrolled in hybrid, online, and technology-enabled content programs. The program acquaints new students with what the school expects of the student and what the student can expect from the school. The program is designed to provide the opportunity for advisement on academic matters, registering for classes, and answering questions. All new students are required to participate in the orientation program.
     

    Advising Services

    Advising services are available to assist students in resolving educational, career, and vocational problems. General personal concerns relating directly to academic success can be addressed on campus whereas more serious concerns will be referred to the appropriate outside agency. The Director of Education, Student Resources Coordinator, Registrar, and Program Directors can help students plan their educational programs as well as adjust to the demands of school.  Students enrolled in 100% online programs may contact their Student Services Coordinator.
     

    Tutorial Assistance

     The school provides assistance for students experiencing academic difficulties.  Faculty will make every effort to identify students in need of assistance.  Students are urged to take the initiative in seeking out-of-class help and to discuss their difficulties with their instructors.  Tutors are available to work with students on an “as needed” basis at no charge to the student.
     

    Health Services

    Miller-Motte College has no health services located at the school. However, hospitals, clinics, and physicians are located nearby. The school seeks to assist students who have special health problems or limitations in the attainment of their educational goals. Services are provided in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

    In the event of accident or illness on campus, the Director of Education should be notified immediately. Students who become ill, injured, or develop health problems requiring professional attention are referred to the emergency room of the hospital or to a local physician in accordance with instructions given by the student or the student’s family. In an emergency situation that requires immediate attention, a student may be taken directly to the hospital.

    Environmental health and safety on the campus are the responsibility of the school. It is the policy of the school to have all facilities comply with the requirements of the state and local building codes, the board of health, and fire department regulations.

     

    School Closings Due to Weather

    When inclement weather causes the possible delay or closing of the school, this information will be announced on local television stations after 6:00 a.m. for day classes and after 3:00 p.m. for evening classes.  Closings for day and evening classes will be announced separately. Specific information is available via Schoolcast  which can be accessed through the student portal.
     

    Emergency Information

     In the event of a fire or other disaster that requires evacuation of the campus, students should vacate classrooms and other areas of the building in an orderly fashion and gather at the designated locations so that the instructor may take attendance.  Re-entry into the building is allowed only when the all-clear signal has been given.  Students will find evacuation routes posted in each classroom.
     

    Library

    The library offers curriculum related resources, a quiet room to study, computers, and a friendly and comfortable environment for tutoring, reading, research, and the exchange of ideas.

    Library collections are online through the LIRN (Library and Information Resources Network) Research Databases, and via the Library website’s other curated and professionally vetted resources.  Every student has access to millions of academic, peer-reviewed full -text articles, journals, transcripts, audio, video, e-books, photos, and more to support general interest, reference items, and subject specific interests. In addition to resources, there are trained library staff to help each student successfully complete their chosen program.  As well as on-site assistance, students can chat, phone, and email a professional Librarian online.

    A professional online Librarian can be accessed live via the Student Portal or LMS through the Library Website at the following times: 

    Chat (Hours in EST)
    Monday-Thursday: 1pm-8pm
    Saturday: 11am-6pm

    Phone (Hours in EST)
    Monday-Thursday: 1pm-8pm

     

    Housing

    As most students reside within commuting distance, the school does not maintain dormitory facilities. However, students desiring housing accommodations should contact the Director of Admissions for information.
     

    Publications and Announcements

    Announcements can be read via the student portal. Announcements and updates are also posted on the bulletin boards throughout the corridors, classrooms, and student lounge. Student should check the student portal and bulletin boards periodically for any notices and/or special announcements.

     

    Hours of Operation

    Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, from 8:00 am to 10:30 pm and Fridays and Saturdays as needed.  Administrative offices are open Monday through Friday. The dates of operation of the online bookstore are announced prior to the beginning of each term and at registration.  Hours for each department are posted on office doors or near the offices. For current information, check the student portal.

     

    Crime Awareness

    Students are to report to the Executive Director, or in his/her absence to a faculty/staff member, any criminal activities taking place on the premises or in the parking lot of Miller-Motte College. This includes any school-sponsored function. Such actions will then be reported to the proper authorities.
     

    Campus Visitors

    Visitors to the school must check in at the reception desk upon arrival.  Students are invited to have their parents, relatives, or friends tour the campus.  If visitors have questions, they are welcome to meet with the staff.
     

    Children

    Children are not allowed to accompany a student to class or to be left unattended on campus. If a student brings a child to class, the instructor should inform the student of the policy and ask him or her to remove the child from the classroom. If a child is left unattended, the Director of Education or other administrator should be notified. The Director of Education will then locate the parent and inform him or her of the policy. The school assumes no liability for injuries incurred by minors while on campus.
     

    Student Code of Conduct

    Statement of Shared Responsibility
    Students, faculty, staff and administration constitute a community of learners.  Collectively, we share responsibility for exchanging knowledge and information, creating a culture that respects and values diversity and for maintaining an environment of accountability.  Within the challenging and supporting learning environment at Miller-Motte College, students of all ages, ethnicities, religions, genders, abilities, socio-economic backgrounds and sexual orientations are welcome to engage in the process of preparation for career readiness, active citizenship and lifelong learning.

    In order to realize its mission, all members of the Miller-Motte College community have a responsibility to promote and the right to expect:

    Respect for Persons: 
    The opportunity to ask questions and to express opinions is fundamental to the learning process.  Diversity in perspective strengthens the learning environment for all participants.  All members of the community will demonstrate respect for others while communicating a point of view and while allowing others to do the same, ensuring that the campus is free from intimidation and harassment.  Disagreements among members of the community are expected to be resolved through a process that preserves mutual respect.

    Respect for the Learning Process:
    Community members should be committed to a journey of continuous improvement for themselves and for others.  Each individual brings with him/her a unique set of knowledge, skills, abilities and experiences that add richness to the learning environment.  Individuals will progress at their own rate, within the approved parameters of the curriculum, capitalizing upon their own preferred style of learning in order to make progress on their journey.  The unique journey of each individual should be encouraged and honored. The Student Code of Conduct has been developed to ensure that the learning process is not inhibited or disrupted for any individual or group of individuals.

    Respect for the Learning Environment:
    The physical and virtual classroom, the institutional facilities and the campus, as well as all equipment and learning materials constitute the learning environment. Expectations for adherence to the Student Code of Conduct apply to those instances where the learning experience extends beyond the institution, such as situations that involve a field trip or an internship/externship/clinical/practicum. Equipment and learning materials vary by program. The safety of all members of the learning environment is of the utmost concern to the institution. Students must adhere to the dress code requirements for their program of study. All members of the learning community will utilize the resources provided by the institution as instructed and with caution, making campus officials aware of issues associated with facilities, equipment or learning materials.

    Respect for Academic Integrity:
    All members of the community are required to adhere to institutional standards of academic integrity. One of the greatest values of participating in a community of learners is the opportunity to learn from others; however, individuals must acknowledge the sources of the information that are used to advance a point of view. Academic misconduct involves dishonesty or deception in the fulfillment of academic requirements. It includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, unpermitted collaboration, forged attendance, using advantages not approved by the instructor, knowingly allowing another student to plagiarize or cheat from one’s work or submitting the same assignment for multiple courses without the knowledge of the instructor.

    Student Code of Conduct Policy Statement
    Miller-Motte College affirms its commitment to provide an engaging learning environment and promote the exchange of ideas among the members of the learning community.  All individuals who come to Miller-Motte College to work and study will be accepted as unique individuals worthy or making a valuable contribution to the learning environment.  Discrimination, disruption or harassment on the basis of age, ethnicity, religion, gender, ability, socio-economic background or sexual orientation will not be tolerated.

    Miller-Motte College accepts responsibility for communicating these values to students, faculty, staff, administration and the community served by the institution.  The success of the policy to protect the learning environment and those engaged in the learning process is dependent upon the willingness of members of the community to make known behaviors and conduct that violate the policy.

    A student found to have committed any one of the following Student Code of Conduct Offenses will be subject to the full range of sanctions including written reprimand, suspension and expulsion.

    Student Code of Conduct Offenses
    Academic Misconduct –Dishonesty or deception in the fulfillment of academic requirements. It includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, unpermitted collaboration, forged attendance, using advantages not approved by the instructor, knowingly allowing another student to plagiarize or cheat from one’s work or submitting the same assignment for multiple courses without the knowledge of the instructor.

    Dating Violence
    – Violence committed an individual (A) who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and (B) where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: (i) The length of the relationship (ii) The type of relationship (iii) The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.  This offense applies to any such illegal activity by a current student, staff or faculty member.

    Domestic Violence
    –  Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction. This offense applies to any such illegal activity by a current student, staff or faculty member.

    Dishonesty
    – Provision and/or submission of false information to the institution by forgery, alteration or misuse of documents or records, falsifying a written or oral statement or submission of false identification to the institution.

    Failure to Adhere to Dress Code –
    Programs of study are created to develop the knowledge, skills and competencies required for an identified set of career outcomes. As such, dress code standards that replicate the work environment may be imposed upon students enrolled in particular programs of study. The Dress Code may include requirements to wear a specific uniform. Alternatively, the Dress Code may limit attire that is worn to school or to school - related activities to defined standard, such as business attire or business casual attire.  Finally, the Dress Code may necessitate removal of piercings and/or requirements to cover tattoos.

    Mental or Bodily Harm to Self
    – Conduct that causes harm or has the potential to cause harm to one’s self including the intentional infliction of mental or bodily harm upon one’s self or taking reckless but not accidental, action which could result in mental or bodily harm.

    Mental or Bodily Harm to Others
    – Conduct that causes harm or has the potential to cause harm to another individual, including:
    • Behavior that intentionally inflicts mental or bodily harm on another person;
    • Behavior that attempts to inflict mental or bodily harm on another person;
    • Taking reckless, but not accidental, action that could result in infliction of mental or bodily harm on another person;
    • Causing another individual to believe that the offender may cause mental or bodily harm to them;
    • Sexual misconduct;
    • Any act that demeans or degrades another individual; and/or
    • Coercion of an individual to inflict mental or bodily harm to another person.
    Stalking – Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (A) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or (B) suffer substantial emotional distress.  Stalking may include non-consensual communication, including in-person communication or contact, surveillance, telephone calls, voice messages, text messages, email messages, social networking site postings, instant messages, postings of pictures or information on websites, written letters, gifts or any other undesired communication that elicits fear. 

    Sex Discrimination and Harassment  – Conduct that encompasses discrimination on the basis of an individual’s sex in any aspect of employment or education, including but not limited to,
    • Hiring and firing;
    •  Compensation, assignment, or classification of employees;
    • Transfer, promotion, layoff, or recall;
    • Job advertisements;
    • Recruitment;
    • Testing;
    • Grading;
    • Acceptance or participation in an academic program or school activity;
    • Use of employer's facilities;
    • Training programs;
    • Fringe benefits;
    • Pay, retirement plans, and disability leave; or other terms and conditions of employment; and
    • Engaging in conduct that has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or work performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment in which to work or learn. 

    Sexual harassment, including sexual violence, is a form of discrimination; it is illegal.  No employee or student, either in the workplace or in the academic environment, should be subject to unwelcome verbal or physical conduct that is sexual in nature. Sexual harassment does not refer to occasional compliments of a socially acceptable nature. It refers to behavior of a sexual nature that is not welcome, that is personally offensive, and that interferes with performance.  It is expected that students, faculty and staff will treat one another with respect.  All students, faculty, staff, and other members of the campus community, including intern/extern/practicum sites, are subject to this policy. 

    Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other visual, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual or gender bias nature, constitute sexual harassment when: 

    • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic status;
    • Submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as a basis for academic or employment decisions or evaluations, or permission to participate in an activity; or
    • The conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or work performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment in which to work or learn.

     Sexual harassment may take many forms-subtle and indirect, or blatant and overt, including but not limited to, the following:  

    • It may occur between individuals of the opposite sex or of the same sex;
    • It may occur between students, between peers and/or co-workers, or between individuals in an unequal power relationship (such as by a supervisor with regard to a supervised employee or an instructor regarding a current student);
    • It may be aimed at coercing an individual to participate in an unwanted sexual relationship or it may have the effect of causing an individual to change behavior or work performance;
    • It may consist of repeated actions or may even arise from a single incident if sufficiently severe;
    • It may also rise to the level of a criminal offense, such as battery or sexual violence. 

    Sexual violence is a physical act perpetrated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim's use of drugs or alcohol. An individual also may be unable to give consent due to an intellectual or other disability. Sexual violence includes, but is not limited to, rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion.

    Determining what constitutes sexual harassment under this policy is dependent upon the specific facts and the context in which the conduct occurs. Some conduct may be inappropriate, unprofessional, and/or subject to disciplinary action, but would not fall under the definition of sexual harassment. Examples of unwelcome conduct of a sexual or gender related nature that may constitute sexual harassment may, but do not necessarily, include, and are not limited to:
     

    • Rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual coercion or other sexual violence;
    • Sexually explicit or gender related statements, comments, questions, jokes, innuendoes, anecdotes, or gestures;
    • Other than customary handshakes, uninvited touching, patting, hugging, or purposeful brushing against a person's body or other inappropriate touching of an individual's body;
    • Remarks of a sexual nature about a person's clothing or body;
    • Use of electronic mail or computer dissemination of sexually oriented, sex-based communications;
    • Sexual advances, whether or not they involve physical touching;
    • Requests for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised job or educational benefits, such as favorable reviews, salary increases, promotions, increased benefits, continued employment, grades, favorable assignments, letters of recommendation;
    • Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, magazines, cartoons, or screen savers;
    • Inquiries, remarks, or discussions about an individual's sexual experiences or activities and other written or oral references to sexual conduct. 

     Any employee or student bringing a discrimination or sexual harassment complaint or assisting in the investigation of such a complaint will not be subjected to retaliation in terms and conditions of employment and/or academic standing, nor discriminated against, terminated, or expelled because of the complaint. Intentionally providing false information, however, is grounds for discipline. 

    "Retaliation" may include, but is not limited to, such conduct as:  

    • The denial of adequate personnel to perform duties;
    • Frequent replacement of members of the staff;
    • Frequent and undesirable changes in the location of an office;
    • The refusal to assign meaningful work;
    • Unwarranted disciplinary action;
    • Unfair work performance evaluations;
    • A reduction in pay;
    • The denial of a promotion;
    • Dismissal;
    • Transfer;
    • Frequent changes in working hours or workdays;
    • Unfair grade;
    • Unfavorable reference letter. 

    Determining what constitutes discrimination under this policy will be evaluated on a case by case basis and depends upon the specific facts and the context in which the conduct occurs. Some conduct may be inappropriate, unprofessional, and/or subject to disciplinary action, but would not fall under the definition of discrimination. Individuals who violate this policy are subject to discipline up to and including termination and/or expulsion, in accordance with the Miller-Motte College’s Student Code of Conduct. Other, lesser sanctions may be imposed, depending on the circumstances.   Victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking should contact his or her Executive Director to request changes to academic and working situations and how to request protective measures and receive support resources as set forth in the campus Annual Security Reports.

    Discrimination
    - Civilly, criminally or administratively prohibited unequal treatment of a person based upon age, ethnicity, religion, gender, ability, socio-economic background, veteran status or sexual orientation.

    Disruption/Obstruction – Obstructing or interfering with any institutional functions or activities, including instruction within a physical or virtual classroom.

    False Report of Emergency
    – Causing, making or circulating a false report or warning of fire, explosion, crime or other threat to safety.

    Destruction of Property –
    Intentionally or recklessly, but not accidentally, damaging, destroying, defacing or tampering with institutional property, property associated with the institution including internship/externship sites or the property of any person on or associated with the campus.

    Theft or Possession of Stolen Property or Service –
    Taking an item or utilizing a service without consent of an official of the institution or possessing property that can reasonably be determined to have been stolen from the campus for from an employee or student of the campus.

    T
    respassing –Forcible or unauthorized entry into any institutional facilities or facilities associated with the institution.

    Possession of Weapons or Dangerous Materials
    – Unauthorized possession of a weapon or dangerous materials, including, but not limited to firearms, compressed-air guns, pellet guns, BB guns, knives, explosive devices, incendiary devices, fireworks, ammunition or any other dangerous materials.

    Manufacture, Distribution, Sale, Offer for Sale, Possession or Misuse of Drugs or Alcohol –
    Manufacture, distribution, sale, offer for sale, possession or use of any illegal drug or narcotic or possession or use of alcohol while on campus or engaged in any school related activities.

    Use of Tobacco Products or Electronic Cigarettes in Unapproved   Locations -
    Smoking or use of tobacco products or electronic cigarettes in locations other than those approved for that purpose.

    Violation of Criminal Law –
    An alleged violation of any federal, state or local criminal law where the conduct of a student interferes with the institution’s exercise of its educational objectives or responsibilities.

    Misuse or Abuse of Computers or Computer Networks
    –Misuse, alteration, tampering with or abuse of any computer, computer system, service, program, data, or network, including telephone or computer lines and wireless networks. Abuse includes utilization of school computers or Internet access in order to access pornographic web sites or to distribute pornographic material.

    Misuse of Safety Equipment –
    Unauthorized use of or alteration of firefighting equipment, safety devices or other emergency safety equipment.

    Sanctions
    Enrollment into the institution signifies the student’s agreement to comply with the Student Code of Conduct.  Failure to comply with the Code of Conduct will result in appropriate disciplinary sanctions. 

    The Student Code of Conduct has been developed to ensure that the learning process is not inhibited or disrupted for any individual or group of individuals. The Code of Conduct additionally serves as a mechanism for educating members of the learning community about appropriate standards of behavior.  In the event that a violation of the Code of Conduct occurs, the school will strive to utilize the incident as a teachable moment, imposing fair and progressive discipline.  However, should an individual commit an egregious violation of the Student Code of Conduct, the school has the responsibility to impose the strictest of sanctions upon the student, up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Disciplinary sanctions are described below.

    Verbal Warning
    A verbal warning is an official conversation held between the Director of Education, or the Executive Director, and the student, making the student aware of an incidence of unacceptable behavior that is in violation of the Student Code of Conduct. A notation will be entered into the Student Information System but documentation does not become part of the student’s permanent record. Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Written Reprimand
    A reprimand is an official written notification of unacceptable behavior that is in violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  The reprimand will be entered into the Student Information System and will become a permanent document in the student’s file. The student will be asked to sign the document and will be provided a copy of the reprimand.  Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Disciplinary Probation
    Disciplinary probation is a conditional status imposed for a designated period of time within a term prohibiting the student from being present without permission on the campus or any property associated with the campus, including internship/externship sites.  The period of time may not exceed 14 calendar days.  Disciplinary probation requires completion of a Code of Conduct Violation Form by an instructor and an approval by the Director of Education or Executive Director.  Disciplinary probation may be used in those limited instances where a student is asked to leave a class for the duration of the day or until the Procedural Interview is conducted. The Procedural Interview should be scheduled within two business days of the incident. A copy of the form should be mailed and/or emailed to the student, indicating when he/she may return to class.  The Disciplinary Probation Form becomes a permanent part of the student file and should also be notated in the Student Information System.  The student must meet with the Director of Education or Executive Director to sign the form prior to returning to class. Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Suspension
    Suspension is the loss of privileges of enrollment at the institution for a designated period of time and prohibits the student from being present without permission on the property of the campus or any property associated with the campus, including internship/externship/clinical/practicum sites. As a result of being placed on suspension, the student will be awarded a grade of W for any course in which they are currently enrolled. Regardless of whether or not the student is subsequently allowed to return to school to complete the program of study, the student is responsible for payment of tuition and fees and/or repayment of financial aid. The student shall be notified of the suspension in writing. The notification of suspension indicates the earliest possible date, in a future term, in which the student may consider submission of a request to return to school.  The student is entitled to an opportunity to appeal the suspension. The notification of suspension becomes a permanent part of the student record and also must be noted in the Student Information System. Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions. The Office of the Chief Academic Officer or the Chief Compliance Officer of Ancora Education must approve suspensions before they are imposed and before a student is notified.

    Expulsion
    Expulsion is the permanent loss of privilege of enrollment at the institution and prohibits the student from being present without permission on the campus or on any property associated with the campus.  The student will be unable to complete his/her program of study with the institution. As a result of being expelled, the student will be awarded a grade of W for any course in which they are currently enrolled. The student is responsible for payment of tuition and fees and/or repayment of financial aid. The student is entitled to an opportunity to appeal the expulsion. The notification of expulsion becomes a permanent part of the student record and also must be noted in the Student Information System. In the event that a student appeal results in retraction of the expulsion, any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion. The Office of the Chief Academic Officer or the Chief Compliance Officer of Ancora Education must approve expulsions before they are imposed and before a student is notified. 

    Procedures
    Filing of a Conduct Violation Form
    Any member of the learning community (students, faculty or staff) may file a Code of Conduct Violation Form to initiate the process to respond to an alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct Violation Form may be found on the Campus Connect site under Academic Forms.  The individual who files the Code of Conduct Violation Form becomes the complainant.  The student being charged with the alleged offense is referred to as the accused.

    All Code of Conduct Violation Forms are first reviewed by the Director of Education.  If the Director of Education determines that sufficient evidence exists to warrant further exploration of the complaint, the next step is for the accused to be scheduled for a Procedural Interview. The accused is sent a copy of the Code of Conduct Violation Form, via email and/or UPS or FedEx, providing a receipt and proof of delivery, which includes a detailed description of the incident, accompanied by a Notification of Violation Letter that indicates the date and time of the procedural interview.  The Notification of Violation Letter provides details concerning the student’s rights and explains the entire process for resolving the alleged violation.

    Procedural Interview
    Any student charged with a violation of the Student Code of Conduct will be scheduled for a Procedural Interview with the Director of Education. In those instances where the Director of Education has filed the Code of Conduct Violation Form, the Executive Director should also be present for the Procedural Interview. The accused is sent a Notification of Violation Letter that indicates the date and time of the Procedural Interview, along with a copy of the Conduct Violation Form, describing the alleged violation.  The Procedural Interview should be scheduled within five (5) business days of receipt the Code of Conduct Violation Form.

    The accused must attend the Procedural Interview.  If the accused fails to appear for the scheduled Procedural Interview, one attempt will be made to reschedule the meeting. The rescheduled meeting shall occur within ten (10) business days of the receipt of the Code of Conduct Violation Form.  If the student again fails to appear for the Procedural Interview, the Director of Education may move forward with the determination of the sanction.

    The purpose of the Procedural Interview is to provide the accused with the opportunity to discuss the allegation that resulted in the filing of the Code of Conduct Violation Form. The Director of Education and/or the Executive Director will begin the meeting by delineating the student’s rights and options, as well as the potential sanctions that may be imposed for the alleged violation.  The accused will have an opportunity to admit or deny the charge made against him/her in the Procedural Interview.  The complainant also has the opportunity to attend the Procedural Interview either in person or via conference call.

    In the event that the accused admits to the charge filed against him/her, the Director of Education and/or the Executive Director will determine the sanction during the Procedural Interview.  The sanction will be notated on a copy of the original Code of Conduct Violation Form. The Code of Conduct Violation Form will then be signed by the Director of Education and/or the Executive Director. The student will be required to sign and date the form as well. The Code of Conduct Violation Form with the original signatures will be placed in the student file; the student will be provided with a copy of the signed form.  The Director of Education will enter a notation in Contact Manager within the Student Information System.

    The accused may deny the alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct and request a Hearing to further explore the facts concerning the alleged violation.  If a hearing is requested, the date and time of the hearing are determined during the Procedural Interview and they are documented on a copy of the original Code of Conduct Violation Form.  The student is provided a copy of the updated Code of Code of Conduct Violation Form with this information as well as a copy of the Hearing Guide.

    Hearing Procedures
    The purpose of a hearing is to provide a forum for the complainant and the accused to present their case regarding the alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  The Executive Director serves as the Hearing Authority and will ultimately determine whether or not the alleged violation is proven.  Please note that the definition of Hearing Procedures proceeding does not include communications and meetings between officials and victims concerning accommodations or protective measures to be provided to a victim.

    The Executive Director or otherwise designated Hearing Authority will begin the Hearing by explaining the accused’s rights and will assure that fairness will be observed throughout the hearing. Attendees of the hearing are limited to the Executive Director or designee, the complainant and the accused.

    The complainant will be given the opportunity to state the main points of the violation, providing evidence supplemented with statements by witnesses. After the complainant concludes his/her presentation, the accused will have the opportunity to state his/her case. The Executive Director or designee may question both the complainant and accused.

    After all evidence and testimony has been presented, the Executive Director will determine whether or not the allegation is warranted.  If the accused is found not to be in violation, the case will be dismissed and the Code of Conduct Violation Form will be documented accordingly and the student will be provided with a copy.

    If the accused is found to be in violation of the Student Code of Conduct, the Executive Director will dismiss the complainant and the accused, indicating that notification of the sanction will be communicated to the student at a specified date and time in the office of the Executive Director.

    As the Hearing Authority, the Executive Director or designee will consider the following when determining the sanction to be imposed:
     

    • Statements from witnesses and evidence presented during the hearing;
    • Seriousness of the violation;
    • Prior disciplinary record of the student;
    • Academic record; and
    • Student progress against program of study. 

    Upon reaching a decision, the Executive Director is expected to update the Conduct Violation Form by indicating the sanction that will be imposed as a result of the violation of the Student Code of Conduct. The Executive Director then meets with the student at the predetermined date and time to discuss the sanction and consequences of any repeat violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  The student is required to sign the form and is provided a copy.  At the same time the student is notified of the outcome of the hearing, a copy of the updated Conduct Violation Form will be provided to the complainant. The Executive Director is expected to make a notation in Contact Manager in the Student Information System and returns the hard copy of the Code of Conduct Violation Form to the student file.

    In the event that the Executive Director determines either suspension or expulsion to be the appropriate sanction, the Code of Conduct Violation Form should be completed accordingly and emailed to the Office of the Chief Academic Officer and the Chief Compliance Officer.  Upon approval from either the Office of the Chief Academic Officer or the Chief Compliance Officer, the Executive Director may proceed with the suspension or expulsion.

    Appeals
    The accused and/or complainant have the right to request an appeal by notifying the Executive Director or Director of Education of his/her intent to do so within three business days after receipt of the written notification of the sanction.  Appeals may be filed for the following reasons: 

    • Inappropriate sanction; or
    • New evidence that was not available at the time of the hearing has become available and is found to be substantial enough to change the outcome of the hearing. 

    The Appeal Board should be comprised of the Executive Director, Director of Education, and three other members of the administrative staff of the institution.  In the event that the complainant is a member of the Appeal Board, that individual will recuse him/herself from the decision-making process. The Appeal Board meets in a closed session, within a reasonable period of time, and either grants or denies the appeal by a majority vote. In the event that there is a tie, due to absence of a member of the Appeal Board, the Executive Director will determine the outcome. In the event that the Executive Director was the complainant, the Director of Education will determine the outcome. If the appeal is granted, the sanction may be changed.

    The individual filing the appeal will be notified in writing, utilizing the Code of Conduct Violation Form, of the decision of the Appeal Board within a reasonable period of time. The notification will be emailed and/or sent through the U.S. Postal Service. A hard copy of the form will be placed in the student file and the Director of Education will enter notes in the Contact Manager Field within the Student Information System.

    Re-enrollment After Suspension
    Students who have been suspended from the institution must petition to return to school after the specified period of time has elapsed. A Request to Re-enroll After Suspension Form is accessible from the office of the Director of Education.  Students who have been suspended must contact the Director of Education for permission to return to the campus or to request that a copy of the form be emailed or mailed. The Petition is submitted to the Director of Education but must be unanimously approved by the Appeal Board.  Re-enrollment may be granted but any repeat instance of violation of the Student Code of Conduct will be grounds for permanent dismissal from the institution.

    Compliance with the Student Discipline Policy and Procedure provisions does not constitute a violation of section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C.1232g), commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

     

    Title IX Compliance

    Ancora Education's Title IX coordinator is responsible for each school's overall compliance with Title IX, including response to reports of sexual misconduct affecting the campus community, as set forth in further detail in Ancora's Title IX Compliance Policy. Questions regarding the application of Title IX and the schools’ compliance with it should be directed to the Title IX coordinator, whose contact information is available below. Students who wish to make a report of sexual misconduct affecting the campus community should follow the grievance procedure published in the catalog.

    Donna R. Gilley
    Ancora Education
    (682) 334-5620
    dgilley@ancoraeducation.com
     

    Academic Integrity and Copyright Infringement Policy

    Students are expected to maintain the highest standards of academic conduct by always submitting their own original work for all assignments, research papers, tests, and projects. Students found to engage in plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty will be subject to negative consequences up to, and including termination from School.

    Plagiarism is the use of another’s words or ideas without proper citation, and includes copying large sections of text or images from print or electronic resources, or another student’s work. Students may avoid plagiarism by forming ideas in their own words, quoting only limited passages of borrowed text, and always acknowledging the origin of borrowed ideas or words with a correct citation.

    Members of the Miller-Motte College community are expected to follow copyright law, Title 17 of the United States Code, while fulfilling the core mission of teaching, research, and extending knowledge and creativity in all areas. The provisions in the copyright law allow an author, artist, composer or other creator of a work to control the use of his or her work by others, with important exceptions. Copyright protections and the accompanying exceptions extend to print and digital formats of literary works, computer software, musical works, unpublished materials such as manuscripts, dramatic works, pantomimes and choreographic works, pictorial and graphic works, sculpture, motion pictures and other audiovisual works, sound recordings, and architectural works. Failure to observe copyright or license agreements Unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material and unauthorized peer-to-peer sharing using the institution’s information technology system may result in disciplinary action, including dismissal from the school, legal action by the copyright owner, and/or criminal penalties.

    Since the files distributed over peer-to-peer networks are primarily copyrighted works, there is a risk of liability for downloading material from these networks. To avoid these risks, there are currently many "authorized" services on the Internet that allow consumers to purchase copyrighted works online, whether music, ebooks, or motion pictures. By purchasing works through authorized services, consumers can avoid the risks of infringement liability and can limit their exposure to other potential risks, e.g., viruses, unexpected material, or spyware.  Other legal alternatives for downloading or otherwise acquiring copyrighted material include utilizing the school’s library facilities or public lending libraries.

    Questions concerning this institution’s copyright policy should be directed to Centralized Library Services.

    Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws 
    Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.

    Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. For more information, please see the website of the U.S. Copyright Office at 
    www.copyright.gov.

    Copy equipment at the school may not be used to copy copyrighted material. In addition, none of the material listed below may be copied by students or employees. Copyrightable works include the following categories: 

    1. Literary works, including computer software
    2. Musical works, including any accompanying words
    3. Dramatic works, including any accompanying music
    4. Pantomimes and choreographic work
    5. Pictorial, graphic, and sculptured works
    6. Motion pictures and other audiovisual works
    7. Sound recordings
    8. Architectural works 

    These categories should be viewed broadly. For example, computer programs and most “compilations” may be registered as “literary works;” maps and architectural plans may be registered as “pictorial, graphic, and sculptured works.”

     

    Computer Use and File Sharing

    Miller-Motte College computer systems and networks are provided for student use as a part of school's academic programs. Students are not permitted to use their personal devices on the school's computer network.  This poses a security risk to the school's infrastructure and is prohibited.  All students have a responsibility to use Miller-Motte Collegecomputer systems and networks in an ethical and lawful manner. Students found to have misused computer systems and networks may receive disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Miller-Motte College will not tolerate any abuse of computer systems and networks. This is not an all-inclusive list. In the case of a dismissal, the student will be subject to the refund policy as outlined in the school catalog.

    Examples of behaviors considered to be in violation of the school's policy on student computer systems and network include:

    • Sending obscene, harassing, intimidating and/or threatening messages through email or other means. Viewing or downloading, displaying, printing or otherwise disseminating material that is sexually explicit, profane, obscene, harassing, fraudulent, racially offensive, defamatory or otherwise unlawful.

    • Downloading any software programs, files or other items including but not limited to internet accelerator programs, search engines, upgrades, enhancements, fonts, graphic images, photos or other items unless authorized to do so by the Director of Education or Executive Director. Transferring personal software to Miller-Motte College computers is prohibited.

    • Soliciting business, selling products, or otherwise engaging in commercial activities or personal advertisements. Using Miller-Motte College computer and/or network to perpetrate fraud, misrepresentation or illegal activity. 

    • Providing others with access to one’s personal computer accounts or attempting to gain access to the computer accounts, files or system to which authorized access has not been granted.

    • Attempting to circumvent or compromise Miller-Motte College computer security or the security of any remote system accessed through South Miller-Motte College equipment or networks.

    • Creating or releasing computer viruses or engaging in other destructive or potentially destructive programming activities.

    • Modifying, altering, or tampering with systems hardware or software unless explicitly authorized to do so by the Executive Director.

     

    Attendance Policy

    The student is responsible for initiating any request to make up work missed because of class absence (see Make-Up Policy). Makeup of missed classes does not remove an absence from a student’s record. If a student is absent from all classes for 14 or more consecutive calendar days, the student may be withdrawn from school.


    Clock hour programs:
    Programs that are considered clock hour programs for Title IV purposes, and are identified as such in this catalog, may have specific attendance requirements. Students are expected to attend all courses and to be in class at the appropriate times. The licensing boards that govern some of these programs may require that all missed class time be made up and may impose limits on the number of hours that may be missed and subsequently made up. Make up hours are scheduled by the instructor and attendance is monitored and recorded. Any make up hours allowed must be completed prior to the end of the term in which the course is taken. The instructor of each course will notify students of the specific attendance policy at the beginning of the course. Students who miss class sessions in clock hour programs may experience a delay in the disbursement of their aid, as disbursements are based on the students’ successful completion of courses, which is impacted by attendance.

    To remain eligible for Title IV funding and to progress to the next course a student in a clock hour program must meet a 90% attendance threshold per course.

    Ground courses: Attendance for ground courses is taken in the physical classroom by the instructor. Students who fail to attend the physical class sessions for 14 or more consecutive calendar days may be withdrawn. Regardless of the situation resulting in an absence from class, students are expected to be in attendance a minimum 60% per grading period to pass a course.  Any attendance below 60% may result in the student failing the course. 

    Online courses: Attendance for online courses is taken by students logging in and completing work in the online classroom. Students are expected to actively participate in their online courses at least twice per week. Students who do not submit substantive work for their online courses for 14 or more consecutive calendar days may be withdrawn.  Regular Attendance in an Online Class is an important contributor to student success in online courses. To comply with federal mandates for school’s handling of student aid, certain kinds of student activity may or may not count as participation sufficient to qualify as attendance in online courses.

    For attendance to be earned, the student must complete at least one of the following academic events (1) complete a quiz, (2) complete and post an assignment, or (3) post at least once a week to a relevant class discussion board.

    Hybrid courses: Attendance for hybrid courses is taken both in the physical classroom and by students logging in and completing work in the online classroom. Students are expected to attend both the physical class sessions and actively participate in their online classes. Students who fail to either attend the physical class or post attendance by completing substantive work in the online classroom for 14 or more consecutive calendar days may be withdrawn.  Regardless of the situation resulting in an absence from class students are expected to be in attendance a minimum 60% per grading period to pass a course.  Any attendance below 60% may result in the student failing the course.

    Some programmatically accredited programs or programs that require licensure may have additional attendance requirements. These requirements are outlined under State/Programmatic-Mandated Policies. Where the state attendance and makeup work policy differs from the institutional policy, the stricter policy applies.

     

    Incomplete Policy

    The grade of Incomplete (I) is given for a valid reason when a student is unable to complete all the work in the course by the time the course ends. An Incomplete Grade Request Form must be submitted to the Director of Education, or designee, prior to the last day of the course. Students must initiate arrangements with instructors and receive approval of the Director of Education, or designee, to make up the required work within 14 calendar days after the end of the course. At that time, the grade will be calculated based on the work submitted and will replace the Incomplete. Incomplete grades count as credits/hours attempted but not completed. When the Incomplete is converted to a letter grade, it will be computed as credits/hours completed or failed, depending on the grade assigned.

    Procedure:

    • The student must request the Incomplete prior to the last day of the course using the Incomplete Grade Request;
      •  In order to approve an Incomplete, the student must have earned a minimum of a 25% in the course.
      • The Director of Education, or designee, may approve students under an earned 25% with mitigating circumstances.    
        • Additional documentation may be required to approve exceptions.
    • If approved, The Director of Education, or designee, will notify the student prior to an “I” grade being entered in the Student Information System;
    • Student must make up all Incomplete grades within 14 days of the end of the course;
      •  All hours completed with a qualified instructor on campus to assist with makeup work will count toward the student’s attendance hours and is documented with an AD – Attendance Change Form;
    • Grade will be converted to “F” or the grade the student has earned at the end of the incomplete period approved unless special approval is given to extend the deadline;
    • Appropriate supporting documentation for the grade will be uploaded into Image Now along with the approved Incomplete Grade Request once the “I” grade is resolved;
    • Students who are approved for an “I” grade in their final course may be withdrawn until the “I” is resolved if the approval extends beyond the Drop/Add period and the student isn’t enrolled in any other courses;
      • In these cases, the student must be dropped, finish hours, reinstated, grades and hours finalized, then approved to graduate.
    • Students may request a late incomplete after the course has closed through the Director of Education, Student Services Coordinator; Student Resource Coordinator, or Hybrid Teaching Assistant (SSC/SRC/HTA).
      • Late incomplete requests must be submitted in writing within 7 calendar days of the end of the course and will be approved only based on mitigating circumstances.
      • Late incompletes beyond a week may only be granted by the VP of Academics or the AVP Online Academic Operations in cases where the campus fails to provide the student with reasonable access to complete coursework.
     

    Late Work Submission/Make-up Policy

    The campus recognizes that there are circumstances and events which require students to miss classes, resulting in the need for makeup work. Because Ancora Education believes the purpose of completing work is to help the student learn and be successful, instructors are expected to work with students on the submission of makeup work. Students must initiate contact with the instructor to discuss the makeup work in question. The student will work with the instructor on new deadlines and any deductions that may result based on the late work, not to exceed 20% per assignment. Examinations may be made up only with documented extenuating circumstances. The deadline must be prior to the end of the term, or else the student must apply for an Incomplete (see the Incomplete policy). Online modality assessments are considered normal makeup work, not examinations for purposes of this policy. The procedure for requesting the opportunity to makeup required work can be obtained from the instructor. Students will not be charged for completing makeup work.
     

    State-Mandated Programmatic Make-up Policies

    Where the state attendance and make-up work policy differs from the institutional policy, the stricter policy applies.

    Massage Therapy Programs (Make-Up Work ): Students are expected to attend all classes and to be in class at the appropriate time. The Rules and Regulations of the NC Board of Massage & Bodywork Therapy state, “For a student to receive credit in a course, the student shall attend no less than 75 percent of the instructional hours of the course. The student shall also make up sufficient missed instructional hours to equal no less than 98 percent of the instructional hours in the course according to the procedures established by the school.”  It may be possible to make up missed classes by reviewing videos and attending after-school question and answer sessions or by other means at the discretion of the instructor. If a student is incomplete in any modality, certification will be withheld until it becomes complete. A student may become complete either by repeating the modality with a later class or by receiving private tutoring from a Miller-Motte College instructor approved by the lead instructor in that modality. All make-ups must be completed before the end of the academic term.

    Cosmetology Programs (Make-Up Work): Students are expected to attend all classes and to be in class at the appropriate time. It may be possible to make up missed classes by reviewing videos and attending other classes at the discretion of the instructor. According to the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art, a student may not receive more than ten hours per day and 48 hours per week. Also, the North Carolina State Board mandates that in the programs of Cosmetology, Cosmetology Instructor, Esthetics Technology, and Nail Technology, students must complete the total number of hours for which the program is approved as well as the appropriate performances before a student may sit for the licensure exam. All make-up hours and services must be completed before the end of the academic term.

     

    Leave of Absence

    An approved Leave of Absence (LOA) is a temporary interruption in a student’s academic attendance for a specific period of time in an ongoing program.

    Leave of Absence Conditions

    The following conditions may be considered: 

    • Medical Leave (including pregnancy)
    • Family Care (unexpected childcare issues or medical care of family)
    • Military Duty
    • Jury Duty

    The following requirements apply:

    A student may be granted a Leave of Absence (LOA) if: 

    • A LOA request is submitted in writing within 14 calendar days of the student’s last date of attendance, which includes the reason for the request.  If unforeseen circumstances prevent the student from providing a written request within 14 calendar days the campus may use its discretion to grant the student’s request if the student provides the written documentation validating the unforeseen circumstances  by the last day of the campus’s attendance policy.
    • Generally, only one leave of absence may be granted to a student in a 12-month period. However, more than one leave of absence may be granted for limited, well documented cases due to unforeseen circumstances that are listed below, provided that the total number of days the student remains on LOA may not exceed 180 days during a consecutive 12-month time frame. Reasons for potential second leaves of absence include:
      • One additional leave of absence, if it does not exceed 30 days and the campus determines that it is necessary due to unforeseen circumstances; this type of leave of absence would have to be subsequent to the granting of the single leave of absence, which is granted at the campus's discretion.  This may not be possible in all programs based on term structure.
      • Subsequent leaves of absence if the campus documents that they are granted for jury duty, military reasons, or circumstances covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) (Public Law 103-3), enacted February 5, 1993. The circumstances that are covered under the FMLA, as applied to students, are:
        • Birth of a son or daughter of the student and the need to care for that son or daughter (within 12 months of the date of birth)
        • Placement of a son or daughter with the student for adoption or foster care (within 12 months beginning on the date of the placement)
        • Need to care for the student’s spouse, or a son, daughter, or parent, if the spouse son, daughter, or parent has a serious health condition
        • A serious health condition that makes the student unable to function as a student
    • There may be limitations on LOA eligibility for students enrolled in term-based programs due to scheduling requirements.  This is due to the requirement that a student must return into the same classes when coming off of an LOA.
    • The total days considered on LOA will include days up to the point in the coursework where the student left on LOA.  It is strongly advised that the student return at the beginning of the term when possible in order to benefit from a review of the material.  Any resubmitted work the student completes will be graded, and the higher of the two grades will be counted.
    • The student must have earned a successful grade in at least one course before being eligible to apply for an LOA
    • A student may not apply for an LOA between terms, they are only eligible if they start an LOA during a term.

    Failure to return from an approved leave of absence will result in withdrawal from the campus, may have an impact on aid, loan repayment and exhaustion of the loan grace period for the total days the student was on the LOA. Students in a LOA status may not receive further financial aid disbursements until returning to active status.  Contact the financial aid office for more information about the impact of a LOA on financial aid.

     

    Withdrawal

    Students desiring to withdraw from the school or an individual course should contact the Director of Education or Registrar to obtain the necessary forms and procedures for official withdrawal. Students who withdraw from all courses within the drop/add period will receive a grade of “W*”.  Students who withdraw from one or more courses during drop/add but maintain enrollment in at least one or more course will be unregistered from the courses being dropped. Students withdrawing after the drop/add period and prior to the last day to withdrawal will receive a “W.” Students withdrawing from one or more courses after the last day to withdrawal will receive the grade earned in the course. “Ws” are not computed in the student’s GPA. Students who receive Federal Student Loans must schedule an exit interview with a Financial Services Officer before they leave school, either by graduation or withdrawal. Students who are unable to finish a term due to deployment for active duty military service, whether enlisted, reserve, or National Guard will find the policy regarding military withdrawals in the "Withdrawal due to Military Deployment" section of this catalog.

    Last Day to Withdraw:  
    A student is awarded a grade of W (Withdrawal) when withdrawing from a course or all courses prior to the last day to withdraw for a term or grading period.  The last day to withdraw for a standard quarter is the last day of the ninth week of the quarter. The last day to withdraw for a course delivered in a six week module is the last day of the fifth week.
     

    Withdrawal Due to Military Leave or National Emergency

    Students who are unable to finish a term due to military leave or declared national emergency, are entitled to a refund of all tuition and fees for the unfinished term. Credit will not be granted for unfinished courses, and the unfinished courses will not impact the student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress. If the student is deployed or impacted by a national emergency at the end of a term and completes his or her courses, then the tuition will not be refunded, the credits will be earned, and the student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress will reflect the inclusion of those credits. Such a student will be released from any financial obligations for future terms. Students who choose to return to school can reapply as returning students. Affected students should confirm in writing their request to be removed from grading period and provide supporting evidence, such as a copy of official orders, and/or a letter from a superior, to document the activation and/or deployment.  Students are also encouraged to consider taking courses online whenever possible during deployments, so that they can continue to progress toward completion of their programs.

    Affected individuals include the following, as well as their spouses and dependents: 
    • Active duty military personnel serving during a war, military operation or national emergency.
    • Members of the National Guard performing a qualifying duty (i.e., called to active service by the President or Secretary of Defense for a period of more than 30 consecutive days) during a war, military operation or national emergency.
    • People who reside or are employed in an area declared a disaster area by any Federal, State or local official in connection with a national emergency.
    • People who suffer economic hardship as a result of a war, military operation, or national emergency.
     

    Re-Admission

    Students who have withdrawn from Miller-Motte College and wish to be readmitted should contact the school. If the application for re-admission is for a different curriculum, the standard requirements for a change of program will apply. All applicants for re-admission will be required to complete the Smarter Measures Assessment the first time they re-enroll, unless taken during their previous enrollment. The assessment measures student readiness to return to school and engage in post-secondary learning based on non-cognitive indicators of success. The school uses the results of the assessment to determine the type of support that will be most beneficial to the student through the program of study.

    Approval for readmission for the same curriculum or an alternate selection will be based on the applicant's ability and aptitude, the time elapsed since withdrawing, recommendations of the instructors of the program to which the applicant is reapplying, and the applicant's career objectives. Prior tuition balances and student loan statuses must be clear before readmission application forms will be processed. Re-entering students must meet all admission requirements in place at the time of their re-entry. Applicants granted re-admission may have course load restrictions, specific grade and attendance requirements, and/or required advisement sessions in order to remain enrolled at Miller-Motte College.

     

    Loss of Personal Property

    The school does not assume responsibility for the loss of books or other personal property. However, all instructors and students are requested to give the Receptionist all articles found so that the owner may claim them.
     

    Administrative Prerogatives

    The school reserves the right, at any time, to make changes as it deems necessary or desirable in its policies and operating procedures, to modify its tuition rates, to add to or withdraw members from its faculty and staff, to rearrange its courses and programs as teaching policies render it desirable, and to withdraw or re-sequence subjects, courses, and programs if registration falls below the required number.
     

    Grievance Resolution

    Miller-Motte College’s stated objective is the preparation of its graduates for a career in their chosen field of training. If a student has a grievance, the following procedure must be followed. It is Miller-Motte College’s desire that a grievance be settled at the lowest possible level, and resolved as rapidly as possible. 
    1. A student will attempt to resolve a grievance with the person involved.
    2. If a student is unable to resolve the grievance with the person involved, it should be submitted in writing to that person’s supervisor.
    3. If the grievance is still unresolved after two days, the student should submit a written summary to the Executive Director. A meeting will be set up to include the student, person involved, and the Director. Every effort will be made to resolve the grievance at this point.
    4. If the student notifies the Executive Director in writing that the student does not consider the grievance to be resolved, a written summary by the Executive Director, along with all other materials, will be forwarded to:

      Ombudsman Department
      STVT-AAI Education Inc.
      8701 Bedford Euless Rd., Suite 400
      Hurst, Texas 76053
      complaints@ancoraeducation.com

    A written decision on the grievance report will be sent to the student and the School Director within five working days after receipt of the signed grievance.

    Schools accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career School and Colleges (ACCSC) must have a procedure and operational plan for handling student complaints. The student may also consider contacting he school’s accreditor. All complaints reviewed by the accreditor must be in written form and shall grant permission for the accreditor to forward a copy of the complaint to the School for a response. The complainant(s) will be kept informed as to the status of the complaint as well as the final resolution by the accreditor. Please direct all inquiries to:

    Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC)
    2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 302
    Arlington, Virginia 22201
    Phone: 703-247-4212
    www.accsc.org

    A copy of the accrediting agencies complaint form is available at the School and may be obtained by contacting the Executive Director.

    Students may also contact the U. S. Department of Education Ombudsman Group; this office will receive, review and attempt to resolve disputes from students regarding Federal Student Aid complaints. The Ombudsman Group may be reached at:

    U. S. Department of Education
    FSA Ombudsman Group
    830 First Street, N.E.
    Fourth Floor
    Washington, DC 20202-5144
    Phone: 877.557.2575  Fax: 202.275.0549
    http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/disputes/prepare

     

    State Complaint Information

    Students in certificate or diploma programs have a right to file complaints with the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS):

    North Carolina Community College System
    5026 Mail Service Center
    Raleigh, NC 27699-5026
    (919)733-7051


    Students in degree programs have a right to file complaints with the University of North Carolina System. The Licensure Division of the UNC System Office serves as the state entity to receive complaints concerning post-secondary institutions that are authorized to operate in North Carolina. Students can review the Student Complaint Policy, print out and complete the Student Complaint Form, and submit the complaint to:

    North Carolina Post-Secondary Education Complaints
    c/o Student Complaints
    University of North Carolina System Office
    910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688

    For more information, send an email to: studentcomplaint@northcarolina.edu


    Massage Therapy students have a right to file complaints with the North Carolina Board of Massage and Bodywork Therapy:

    North Carolina Board of Massage and Bodywork Therapy
    P.O. Box 2539
    Raleigh, NC 27602
    (919)546-0050


    Esthetics Technology students have a right to file complaints with the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners:

    North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners
    207 Front Street, Suite 110
    Raleigh, NC 27609
    919-733-4117
     

    Statement of Non-Retaliation

    In many instances, Ancora Education must rely on individual faculty, staff, and students to report to the appropriate office cases where it appears that a member or members of the community are not complying with applicable law or policy. A major deterrent to such reporting is the fear that the person or persons against whom the report is made will retaliate against the person making the report. The purpose of this policy is to clearly articulate that Ancora Education prohibits retaliation against those who make reports of possible non-compliance and good-faith grievances raised by students.

    Faculty, administrators, and staff shall not intimidate or take retaliatory action, as defined below, against any member of the community, who makes a report of the type defined below in good faith and without malice.

    This Policy also prohibits persons from knowingly and intentionally making a report of non-compliance or grievance that is knowingly false.

    The prohibition against retaliation applies to:  

    1. The disclosure of information concerning conduct that the reporter believes is illegal or in violation of campus policies;
    2. Disclosures made during compliance review or a peer review process;
    3. The filing of a legitimate complaint, grievance, or incident report

     The types of retaliation that are prohibited include but are not limited to:  

    1. Intimidation;
    2. Adverse actions with respect to the reporter's work assignments, salary, vacation, and other terms of employment;
    3. Unlawful discrimination;
    4. Termination of employment;
    5. Adverse actions against a relative of the reporter who is a Ancora Education employee or student at an institution owned and operated by Ancora Education; and
    6. Threats of any of the above   

    Note that an adverse personnel, academic or other disciplinary action against an employee or student whose conduct or performance warrants such action for reasons unrelated to the reporting of a concern will not be deemed a violation of this policy.

    Individuals who violate this policy shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary proceedings as set forth in the catalog, and, if found to have violated the policy, they may be subjected to the full range of available sanctions, up to and including termination of employment or dismissal from an academic program.

     

    Arbitration

    A condition of enrollment is the signing of an enrollment agreement by both the student and a school administrator. The following provision with respect to arbitration is part of the enrollment agreement.

    You (the student) and Miller-Motte College agree that any dispute arising out of or relating to this enrollment agreement, your enrollment or your attendance at Miller-Motte College, whether such dispute arises during or after your attendance and whether the dispute is based on contract, tort, statute, or otherwise, shall be resolved by binding arbitration in the city and county in which the school is located. You (the student) and Miller-Motte College each further agrees that this arbitration provision provides each party with its exclusive remedy for redress of any grievance or resolution of any dispute arising out of this Agreement, AND EACH PARTY EXPRESSLY WAIVES ANY RIGHT, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION THE RIGHT TO TRIAL BY JURY, IT MIGHT HAVE TO SEEK REDRESS IN ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL COURT OR OTHER FORUM, except for an action to enforce in court an arbitration award rendered to this Agreement.
     

    Care of Facilities

    Smoking, eating, and drinking are prohibited in the classrooms and the hallways of Miller-Motte College. The school has provided a student lounge for eating and drinking and an outside area for smoking.  Miller-Motte College maintains a smoke-free environment.  Smoking and use of any tobacco products are prohibited on Miller-Motte College campus grounds and property.
     

    Student Consumer Information

    The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 1998, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 requires institutions to provide annual notice to students of the availability of consumer information on a range of topics, including:  
    • retention and graduation rates;
    • financial assistance available to students and requirements and restrictions imposed on Title IV aid;
    • campus crime statistics;
    • other institutional information including: the cost of attendance, accreditation and academic program data, facilities and services available to disabled students, and withdrawal and refund policies.  

    In addition to the annual notice, students and the general public can access each disclosure and related consumer information online at the following address:

    http://www.miller-motte.edu/why-miller-motte/consumer-information/

    Students are entitled to receive a paper version of this information upon request from the Executive Director.

     

    Permanent Closure

     If the Board of Directors of the school decides to close the school, currently enrolled students in good standing and who remain in good standing will be allowed to complete their program of study. New students will not be admitted or former students readmitted. Currently enrolled students in good standing may be transferred to comparable institutions.
     

    Academic Resources, Policies, & Procedures

     

    Student Classification

    a. Full-time Student - For credit hour programs, a full-time student is a student scheduled for 12 or more credit hours per term.  For clock hour programs, all students enrolled in a program of at least 900 clock hours are considered to be full-time.

    b. Three-quarter time Student - A three-quarter time student is a student scheduled for at least nine but less than 12 credit hours per term.

    c. Half-time Student - A half-time student is a student scheduled for at least six but less than nine credit hours per term.

    d. Regular Student - A regular student is an admitted student who is enrolled in a degree, diploma, or certificate program in good academic standing.

    e. Non-Matriculating Students – Non-matriculating students are those who seek admission for course credit in order to meet specific educational needs but do not wish to take the entire required curriculum leading to an academic credential. The non-matriculating student is required to submit an application as such and is not eligible for federal or state aid.

    f. Auditing Students – In some instances a student may be allowed to audit a previously passed course in his/her program for the purpose of improving skills or knowledge base. Audited courses are assigned a grade of AU and do not count as credits attempted or earned for any purposes and do not have any effect on calculations of pace or GPA.

     

    Definition of a Credit Hour

    Miller-Motte College awards quarter credit hours for all degree programs and most diploma/certificate programs, with the exception of some clock hour programs as noted below.

    A credit hour is defined as an amount of work represented by intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than (1) one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or (2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practica, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

    Credit in traditionally delivered programs is measured in credit hours and is calculated based upon the following attribution formula:

    One quarter credit hour equals, at a minimum, 10 classroom hours of lecture, 20 hours of laboratory, and 30 hours of externship. A class hour is an instructional period of fifty (50) minutes of instruction in a sixty (60) minute period. For Title IV purposes, the school uses the classroom hours of instruction plus out-of-class hours (Study/Prep/Review) identified for the course(s).

    The syllabus for each course describes both the hours of classroom instruction as well as the out-of-class learning activities required to support the academic credit awarded for the course. Many courses are a combination of lecture, lab, and practicum.
     

    Definition of a Clock Hour

    A clock hour is defined as fifty minutes of instruction within a sixty-minute period.
     

    Admission to Classes

    Students are admitted to classes only with official written authorization (i.e., schedules, class change notifications, and attendance change notifications). No visitors (including relatives, spouses, children, friends, and pets) are permitted in classes at any time. Students are expected to attend all classes beginning with the first class session. To remain officially enrolled in a class, a student must attend at least once prior to the conclusion of the drop/add period.
     

    Registration

    All students are expected to register during the time scheduled for that purpose. Quarterly registration dates are published and announced. The school reserves the right to schedule courses that are deemed appropriate for the best educational sequence for the student and the school. Course schedules and course loads should be carefully planned by the student in consultation with his/her Program Director or the Director of Education. Each student is responsible for being familiar with the requirements of his/her program of study and for keeping account of progress toward completion of graduation requirements. The student is expected to be familiar with the regulations set forth in the catalog. Copies are available in the administrative offices. An electronic copy of the catalog is available on the student portal. A student who desires to register for course work above the normal course load outlined for the curriculum must obtain written permission from his/her Program Director who must receive final approval from the Director of Education.

     

    Schedule Changes and Drop/Add Period

    Term-based Programs (comprised of 10-week courses in a term)

    The equivalent of the first five school days of each term are designated as the “drop/add period” for schedule changes involving individual courses for students who start at the beginning of the term. By the end of the drop/add period, each student’s schedule must be in place for the remainder of the term. Individual courses dropped during drop/add will not appear on a student’s transcript and no tuition will be charged for those courses.

    Modular-based Programs (comprised of two modules of five- or six-week courses within a term)

    Students in modular-based programs may only add courses to the first module during the first three days, but are permitted to add courses to the second module or drop any course during the first five school days of the term. The first three school days is designated as the “drop/add” period for mid-term starts, who do not attend the first module of the term.  A student registered in a modular-based program must request all schedule changes by the end of the “drop/add period” of the first module to avoid tuition charges or withdrawal grades from appearing on the student’s transcript. Unused books for these dropped courses may be returned to the online bookstore within 30 days of the shipping date in new, unopened condition for a full credit to your student account.

     

    Grading System

    Previous grading scales are available on the school website at https://www.miller-motte.edu/files/9414/7317/0421/MMC_Grade_Scales.pdf

    Grade

    Definition

    Quality Points

    A

    90-100 Excellent

    4

    B

    80-89 Above Average

    3

    C

    70-79 Average

    2

    D

     60-69 Below Average

    1

    F

    0-59 Failing

    0

    W

    Withdrawal   

    Not calculated

    W*

    Withdrawal excluded from SAP

    Not calculated

    +S

    Satisfactory (70% or higher)

    Not calculated

    U

    Unsatisfactory (Below 70%)

    Not calculated

    I

    Incomplete

    Not calculated 

    TO

    Passed by examination

    Not calculated

    T

    Credit by Transfer
    (before February 2011)

    Not calculated

    T1

     Credit By Transfer
    (as of February 2011)

    Not calculated

    P

    Pass (60% or higher)

    Not calculated

    NP

    No Pass (Below 60%)

    0

    NA

    Never Attended

    Not calculated

    AU

    Audit

    Not calculated

    *Students enrolled in the Esthetics program must earn a “C” or better in core requirements to be considered passing. Scores below 70% will be assigned grades of “F.”

    +Satisfactory grades are 70% or higher for Title IV programs. STCT programs may have other requirements for S grades (75% or higher). Check with the Director of Education for specific STCT grading information.

    Students who transfer between campuses of an institution that has a main campus with additional locations will have all applicable coursework transferred, both successful and unsuccessful Grades used are listed below.  These grades will be used in calculating both qualitative grade point average and pace of progress as defined in the Standards of Academic Progress policy.   

      

    Grade

     Definition

    Quality Points

    A1

    Grade of A transferred in

    4

    B1

    Grade of B transferred in

    3

    C1

    Grade of C transferred in

    2

    D1

    Grade of D transferred in

    1

    F1

    Grade of F transferred in

    0

    W1

    Grade of W transferred in

    Not calculated

    W*1

    Grade of W* transferred in

    Not calculated

    S1

    Grade of S transferred in

    Not calculated

    U1

    Grade of U transferred in

    Not calculated

    Grade Measurement
    Grades measure the degree to which a student masters the competencies in program coursework and are one measure of a student's ability to meet employment standards in the field for which the student is preparing. Upon the completion of each term, the student is given a letter grade in each course based upon written examinations, practical exercises, projects and other submitted work, as defined in the course syllabus. Reports showing the final grade in each course, the term summary and CGPAs are furnished to each student at the end of each term. Every course for which a student officially registers will appear on the student's official transcript unless the student cancels his/her enrollment prior to the commencement of classes or drops an individual course prior to the end of the drop/add period. All courses entered on a student's official transcript are assigned a letter grade.

     

    Extra Credit Policy

    Each course within a program of study is thoughtfully designed to build upon prior knowledge, introduce new concepts, provide supportive resources, allow the student to validate and remediate personal mastery of the content, and to assess student development of a defined set of competencies and the achievement of a prescribed list of learning objectives. Each activity, assignment and/or assessment associated with a course is carefully constructed to support the development of one or more course learning objectives and one or more competencies. Therefore, the institution does not provide opportunities to earn “extra credit.”
     

    Grade Reports

    Reports showing the final grade earned in each course and grade point averages are issued to students upon completion of each term. Students demonstrating unsatisfactory work at mid-term are notified by instructors through mid-term reports. Students are encouraged to discuss their progress with their instructors throughout each term. Students with questions about a grade should contact the instructor immediately upon receiving the grade.
     

    Grade Change Policy

    Students wishing to contest a grade for a valid reason must do so by the end of the Drop/Add period immediately following the term in which the original grade was earned. A Grade Change Request Form must be submitted to the Director of Education prior to the last day Drop/Add of the immediately following term. The Director of Education will investigate the original grade based on the information provided by the student. The grade change must be resolved within 30 days of the request being made.
     

    Graduation Requirements

    Candidates for graduation must:

    a. Complete successfully all courses, credits, and hours (if applicable) required for the program

    b. Earn a cumulative grade point average of at least a 2.0. Certain programs may require a higher a cumulative grade point average. Refer to the section on program requirements

    c. Complete all competency and skill performance testing required for the program

    d. Attend exit interview(s) conducted by the Financial Services Office if the student has utilized student loans

    e. Be free of all indebtedness to the school

    In addition, all students should plan to attend an exit interview with the Career Services Office and any other graduation seminars prior to graduation.

     

    Graduation with Honors

    Students who meet the requirements for graduation with Associate degrees and whose cumulative grade-point averages meet the following criteria are graduated with the honors indicated.

    HONORS                                MINIMUM GRADE
                                                    POINT AVERAGE

    Cum Laude                                        3.25
    Magna Cum Laude                            3.50
    Summa Cum Laude                           3.75

    Diploma and Certificate graduates whose cumulative grade point averages meet the following criteria are graduated with the honors indicated:

    HONORS                                MINIMUM GRADE
                                                    POINT AVERAGE

    With Distinction                                   3.25


    Students achieving academic and attendance excellence at the end of each term are eligible for the following awards:

    Academic Excellence: Term GPA 4.0

    Academic Honors: Term GPA 3.5-3.99

    Perfect Attendance: Perfect Attendance for the term

     

    Graduation Ceremony

    A formal graduation ceremony is held twice each year during the month of January and July or August. Participants include all graduates from the preceding two quarters.
     

    Special Programs

    Single courses or combinations of single courses are available to prospective students in either day or evening classes. Charges for these courses may vary based on the number and type of courses taken.
     

    Transcripts

    A complete record of every course for which a student registers is maintained in an electronic student records system.  The record of all credits attempted and earned is posted to this form concurrent with the issuance of term grade reports to students.  A record that has been delivered electronically through the secure transcript request website or is printed, sealed and dated constitutes an Official Transcript.  One “Issued to Student” Transcript will be provided at no charge to the student upon request.  Official Transcripts provided to any institution or agency designated by the student will incur a charge of $10.00 each.  Students who have not satisfied their financial obligations to the school are not eligible to receive transcripts.  Written authorization by the student is required for the school to release a Transcript to a third party.

    Transcripts may be requested at www.parchment.com
     

    Satisfactory Academic Progress

    A student must meet the following standards of academic achievement and successful course completion while enrolled at Miller-Motte College.  Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) applies to all students including full or part time status, and all periods of an active regular enrollment regardless of whether or not the student receives financial aid. Student enrollment status is determined at the end of the drop/add period for any given term or payment period. All courses in a program must be successfully completed in order for a student to graduate from the program. Permanent records are maintained for every student indicating courses completed and grades earned. Students must be considered to be in good standing, either as a result of having met SAP, having an approved appeal on file, or having met the terms of a given academic plan, in order to maintain enrollment in a subsequent term. SAP does not apply to students enrolled in professional development/continuing education courses, which are courses not included within the scope of the institution's ACCSC accreditation.

    The following SAP standards are for Credit Hour Programs:

    Evaluation Points: All financial aid SAP evaluations for Credit Hour Programs occur at the end of a term and are cumulative in nature. All students re-entering after a period of non-attendance will have their most recent SAP status reviewed to determine eligibility to return. Re-entries will then be evaluated for SAP in their new enrollment at the end of the term.  SAP is determined by measuring the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the student’s pace toward completion of course credit hours attempted in the academic program. The calculated CGPA and pace are compared against thresholds (see table below) to determine whether or not the student meets SAP (at or above threshold).

    For credit hour programs, credits attempted are those credits for which the student is enrolled at the end of the drop/add period of an academic term. Credits earned are credits for which the student receives a passing grade at the end of the term.

    Satisfactory Progress Thresholds for Credit Hour Programs:  

    Programs greater than 80 Credit Hours

     

    Programs with 60-80 Credit Hours

    Credit Hours Attempted

     Min. CGPA

    Min. Pace

     

    Credit Hours  Attempted

    CGPA

    Pace

    0-36

    1.5

    50%

     

    0 -24

    1.5

    50%

    37-64

    1.75

    60%

     

    25 - 36

    1.75

    60%

    65+

    2.0

    66.67%

     

    37+

    2.0

    66.67%

     

    Programs less than 60 Credit Hours

    Minimum CGPA

    Minimum Pace

    2.0

    66.67%


    At the end of any SAP Evaluation period, if a student’s CGPA or Pace is below the stated threshold, the student’s academic progress is considered unsatisfactory.

    Maximum Timeframe/Maximum Program Length: For financial aid purposes, a student must complete an academic program in no more than one and one half (1.5) times the published normal program length. To determine the maximum timeframe for programs measured in credit hours (for financial aid purposes), take the published number of credit hours necessary to graduate and multiply by 1.5.

    Example:

    92 Published Program Credits x 1.5 Maximum Timeframe = 138 Maximum Attempted Credits Permitted to Complete Program

    If, at any time, it is determined to be mathematically impossible for a student to complete the program of study within the Maximum Timeframe, the student WILL be ineligible for additional Title IV funding and dismissed from the program of study. Students may appeal dismissal for extenuating circumstance and must meet with the Director of Education for the appeal process.  If approved, the student will be placed on extended enrollment and the student's cGPA will continue to update based on the Repeated Courses policy where the highest grade will be applied in each repeated course. However, the student will be assessed no further charges and remain ineligible to receive financial aid.

    Unsatisfactory Academic Progress: Students not meeting SAP are subject to dismissal from their programs of study and are ineligible to receive financial aid, except under certain circumstances.

    Financial Aid Warning for Credit Hour Programs: If a student’s progress in a credit hour program, measured at the end of a term is determined to be unsatisfactory, the school may place the student on Financial Aid Warning status for one term. The student will be advised of the performance necessary to re-establish SAP. A student on Financial Aid Warning is still eligible to receive financial aid. If, at the end of the term during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is above both thresholds for SAP, the student is removed from Financial Aid Warning.

    Financial Aid Probation for Students in Credit Hour Programs: If, at the end of the term during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. This decision is subject to appeal by the student as defined below. Upon approval of a student appeal, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation.

    Appeals of adverse determinations: Students who are ineligible to receive financial aid and are academically ineligible to continue due to unsatisfactory academic progress are advised immediately following the determination. Students may submit a written appeal to the Academic Review Committee.

    This appeal should be filed within five (5) business days of notification of the decision and must explain in writing the circumstances leading to their unsatisfactory academic performance and how those circumstances have been resolved, ensuring they are successful going forward. The Academic Review Committee will consider all information including potential mitigating circumstances such as a severe illness, medical condition or injury, the death of a family member or other special circumstances presented by the student. The Academic Review Committee will uphold or deny the appeal within five (5) business days following receipt of the appeal from the student. A student who has been placed on academic probation due to unsatisfactory academic progress must have an appeal upheld in order to remain enrolled. This should occur prior to the final drop/add date of the term in order to in order to make appropriate scheduling adjustments. The student should attend class while the appeal is being reviewed.

    If an appeal is denied, the student will be dismissed and ineligible to receive financial aid. If the appeal is upheld, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation status for one term. An academic plan will be created for the student, and the student will be considered eligible to receive financial aid. The academic plan must be structured so that a student reestablishes SAP within a reasonable timeframe. The student’s performance against the academic plan will be reviewed at the end of each term with the use of an Academic Plan Reviewed document. If, at the end of a term the student’s performance is consistent with the terms of the academic plan, the student remains eligible to receive financial aid and may continue in school for the subsequent term. If, at the end of a term the student’s performance is determined to be unsatisfactory, the student will be dismissed from the program of study. Students on academic plans will be advised at the end of each term to ensure that they understand their required performance for reestablishing satisfactory academic progress by the end of the plan.

    A student may be dismissed at any time if the Academic Review Committee does not believe the student will be successful in upholding the Academic Plan.  In those cases, the student may submit an additional appeal to continue. The student may be required to complete the Retake program as a condition of  approving their appeal.  A student may reestablish satisfactory academic progress upon successful completion of a term by meeting the thresholds listed in the SAP tables above. Students who re-establish satisfactory academic progress are advised they no longer need to be on an academic plan and remain eligible to receive financial aid.

    Financial Aid Dismissal for Students in Credit Hour Programs: If the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA after a term on Financial Aid Probation, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Dismissal and is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. If the student is making sufficient progress while in this status, the student will receive an Academic Plan Reviewed document to continue eligibility. If the student does not make sufficient progress, the student will be dismissed, subject to additional appeal.


    The following SAP standards are for Clock Hour Programs:

    Evaluation Points: Clock Hour Programs will have an academic evaluation at the end of each module and a financial aid SAP evaluation after the student has attempted the expected hours in a payment period. All students re-entering after a period of non-attendance will have their most recent SAP status reviewed to determine eligibility to return. Re-entries will be evaluated for financial aid SAP after attempting the required hours for the payment period in which they returned.  SAP is determined by measuring the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the student’s pace toward completion of clock hours attempted in the academic program. The calculated CGPA and pace are compared against thresholds to determine whether or not the student meets SAP (at or above threshold).

    For clock hour programs, the clock hours attempted are the total clock hours required for courses in which the student is enrolled after the drop/add period and for which a grade has been entered. Clock hours earned are the hours for courses in which the student successfully completes and earns a passing grade at the end of the grading period.

    Satisfactory Progress Threshold for Clock Hour Programs:

    Clock Hour Programs

      Minimum CGPA

    Minimum Pace

      2.0

    66.67%

    At the end of a payment period, if a student’s CGPA or Pace is below the stated threshold, the student’s academic progress is considered to be unsatisfactory.

    Maximum Timeframe/Maximum Program Length: For financial aid purposes, a student must complete an academic program in no more than one and one half (1.5) times the published normal program length. Repeat courses taken as part of a Title IV program are included in the Maximum Timeframe calculation.

    To determine the maximum timeframe for programs measured in clock hours (for financial aid purposes), take the published number of clock hours necessary to graduate and multiply by 1.5.

    Example:

    1200 Published Clock Hours X 1.5 Maximum Timeframe = 1800 Maximum Clock Hours Attempted Permitted to Complete the Program

    If, at any time, it is determined to be mathematically impossible for a student to complete the program of study within the Maximum Timeframe, the student will be ineligible for additional Title IV funding and dismissed from the program of study.  Students may appeal dismissal for extenuating circumstance and must meet with the Director of Education for the appeal process.  If approved, the student's cGPA will continue to update based on the Repeated Courses policy where the highest grade will be applied in each repeated course. However, the student will remain ineligible to receive financial aid.

    Unsatisfactory Academic Progress:
    Students not meeting SAP are subject to dismissal from their programs of study and are ineligible to receive financial aid, except under certain circumstances.

    Academic SAP Statuses (Clock Hour programs only):
    When a student finishes a MOD but has not yet reached a payment period and is below the SAP standards, the student will hit academic evaluation points. If a student is below SAP standards prior to hitting the first payment period, the student will be placed on Academic Warning. Prior to subsequent payment periods, the student may hit Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal. Academic statuses do not trigger documentation or paperwork but are points at which students should be advised of the potential for financial impacts if performance does not improve.

    Financial Aid Warning for Clock Hour Programs:
    If a student’s progress in a clock hour program, measured after attempting the expected hours for the payment period is determined to be unsatisfactory, the school may place the student on Financial Aid Warning status for one payment period. The student will be advised of the performance necessary to re-establish SAP. A student on Financial Aid Warning is still eligible to receive financial aid. If, at the end of the payment period during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is above both thresholds for SAP, the student is removed from Financial Aid Warning.

    Financial Aid Probation for Students in Clock Hour Programs:
    If, after the student has attempted the expected hours for the next payment period, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. This decision is subject to appeal by the student as defined below. Upon approval of a student appeal, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation.

    Appeals of adverse determinations:
    Students who are ineligible to receive financial aid and are academically ineligible to continue due to unsatisfactory academic progress are advised immediately following the determination. Students may submit a written appeal to the Academic Review Committee.

    This appeal should be filed within five (5) business days of notification of the decision and must explain in writing the circumstances leading to their unsatisfactory academic performance and how those circumstances have been resolved ensuring they are successful going forward. The Academic Review Committee will consider all information including potential mitigating circumstances such as a severe illness, medical condition or injury, the death of a family member or other special circumstances presented by the student. The Academic Review Committee will uphold or deny the appeal within five (5) business days following receipt of the appeal from the student. A student who has been placed on academic probation due to unsatisfactory academic progress must have an appeal upheld in order to remain in school. This should occur prior to the final drop/add date of the term in order to in order to make appropriate scheduling adjustments. The student should attend class while the appeal is being reviewed.

    If an appeal is denied, the student will be dismissed and ineligible to receive financial aid. If the appeal is upheld, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation status for one payment period. An academic plan will be created for the student, and the student will be considered eligible to receive financial aid. The academic plan must be structured so that a student reestablishes SAP within a reasonable timeframe. The student’s performance against the academic plan will be reviewed at the end of each module with the use of an Academic Plan Reviewed document. If, at the end of a module the student’s performance is consistent with the terms of the academic plan, the student remains eligible to receive financial aid and may continue in school for the subsequent term. If, at the end of a payment period the student’s performance is determined to be unsatisfactory, the student will be dismissed from the program of study. Students on academic plans will be advised at the end of each module to ensure that they understand their required performance for reestablishing satisfactory academic progress by the end of the plan. A student may be dismissed at any time if the Academic Review Committee does not believe the student will be successful in upholding the Academic Plan. In those cases, the student may submit an additional appeal to continue. The student may be required to complete the Retake program as a condition of approving their appeal.  A student may reestablish satisfactory academic progress upon successful completion of a term by meeting the thresholds listed in the SAP tables above. Students who re-establish satisfactory academic progress are advised that they no longer need to be on an academic plan and remain eligible to receive financial aid.

    Financial Aid Dismissal for Students in Clock Hour Programs:
    If, after the student has attempted the expected hours for the third and all remaining consecutive payment periods, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Dismissal and is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid.  If the student is making sufficient progress while in this status, the student will receive an Academic Plan Reviewed document to continue eligibility. If the student does not make sufficient progress, the student will be dismissed, subject to additional appeal.

    Students receiving Veterans Education Benefits:
    Students using Veterans Education Benefits are subject to the same calculations of CGPA and Pace, but have different limitations as to how long they may remain not meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress standards.  Students using Veterans Education Benefits will be subject to the following limitations.

    Students enrolled in Title IV eligible programs will no longer eligible to be certified for Veterans Education Benefits once they fail to meet SAP standards for a third consecutive FA evaluation period.  This means students who fail to meet SAP at the end of their Financial Aid Probation term will have their benefits terminated. Student will only be eligible for certification if they return to Satisfactory Academic Progress.  If a student exceeds Maximum Time Frame as defined in the SAP policy above, they are no longer eligible to be certified for Veterans Education Benefits. 

    Other Factors Impacting Academic Standing for Credit and Clock Hour Programs:

    Program Changes: When a student transfers to a new program, the total program length of the new program is used as a basis for determining the maximum program length. All previously attempted coursework that is applicable in the new program is carried forward into the new program, whether it was completed successfully or not (i.e., including grades of F or W), for the purposes of calculating both qualitative and quantitative academic progress. A student who is not meeting SAP standards is not eligible for a program change without approval of the Director of Education or designee. This also applies to students who were not meeting SAP standards at the point of being withdrawn and wish to re-enter in a different program.  Students not meeting SAP standards may be required to complete the Retake program as a condition of SAP Appeal approval.

    Transfer and Proficiency Credits: Transfer and Proficiency credits are entered as grades of “T1” or “TO” which are not computed in a student’s qualitative grade point average. Transfer and proficiency credits are counted as credits attempted and earned for the purposes of calculating a student’s pace of progress in the program. See also Transfer of Credit in this catalog. Students who transfer between campuses of an institution that have a main campus with additional locations will have all applicable coursework transferred, both successful and unsuccessful. These grades will be used in calculating both qualitative grade point average and pace of progress as defined in the Standards of Academic Progress policy. As defined under the Repeated Courses section, only passed courses taken during the Retake Program will be associated with the reentry enrollment.

    Foundation Courses (PA campuses only): When an entering student’s assessments indicate the need for English Language Foundation Courses (ELF), those courses are included as institutional requirements. Refer to the specific program listing for details. Foundation courses may only be repeated once. A student who fails to successfully complete a particular foundation course on the second attempt is subject to dismissal from the program. This determination is subject to appeal. The Academic Review Committee will consider an appeal for a third attempt of a foundations course. The student must submit a written appeal which includes potential mitigating circumstances such as a severe illness, medical condition or injury, the death of a family member or other special circumstances presented by the student. If an appeal is denied, the student will be dismissed from the institution. If the appeal is upheld, the student will be permitted to re-attempt the foundations course.

    Additional Degrees/Diplomas: Degree or diploma students who wish to remain continuously enrolled and pursue an additional program must complete all requirements of the first program before enrolling in a subsequent program. Any successfully completed courses that are contained in the subsequent program will be counted towards completion of that program. (Note: students may not be enrolled concurrently in and receive funding for two Title IV eligible programs).

    Pass/Fail courses:  Grades of S and U are assigned to classes that do not fulfill graduation requirements such as English Language Foundation (ELF) courses that are graded on a pass/fail basis. A grade of W* is assigned for withdrawal from a Pass/Fail class after the Drop/Add period. Foundation courses may not be repeated more than one time without an approved foundations appeal.

    Repeated courses while in an Active Degree Seeking Status:
      F, U, NA, NP, W, and W* grades require repeating and are retained on the transcript. Repeated courses will appear on the transcript with both the new letter grade earned and the original letter grade earned. The highest grade will replace the other attempts for the purposes of calculating the CGPA. Courses which have been repeated will count as credits/hours attempted for the purposes of calculating pace. Students in clock hour programs may not receive financial aid for repeated courses. Students in term-based credit hour programs may receive financial aid to repeat failed courses. Other than Foundation courses, which can only be repeated a single time without appeal approval, there is no fixed limit to the number of times a particular course may be repeated as long as a student is making satisfactory academic progress. As of July 1, 2011, a student’s enrollment status in a term-based, credit hour program for Title IV purposes may include coursework being repeated that was previously taken in the program, but may not include more than one repetition of a specific, previously passed course. The original grade and the repeated grade will both appear on the transcript. Only the highest grade will count for purposes of calculating the CGPA. All attempts count in the pace of the program.

    Repeated courses while in the Non Degree Seeking - Retake Program:  If a student is required to complete the NDS Retake Program as a condition of Re-entry or SAP appeal approval, the courses taken while in the  NDS Status will be treated the same as during Active periods of enrollment with one exception.  If a course is either failed or withdrawn from during the Retake program, they will not be associated with the Active period of enrollment.  Only   passing grades (those higher than the prior attempt) will be associated to the Active program enrollment.  

    Audited courses: Audited courses are assigned a grade of AU. Audited courses do not count as credits attempted or credits earned for any purposes and do not have any effect on the calculations of pace or GPA.

    Grades and CGPA 

    The following table summarizes the effect of specific grades on the calculations of pace and CGPA:
     

    Grade

    Credits Attempted for Pace

    Credits Attempted for CGPA

    Credits Earned

    Quality Points Per Credit

    A

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    4

    B

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    3

    C

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    2

    D

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    1

    F

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    0

    S

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    U

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    W

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    W*

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    T1

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    I

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    TO

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    AU

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    P or PASS

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    NP

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    Withdrawal Grades for Institutional Withdrawals: The W grade is assigned to class withdrawals when a student withdraws or stops attending all courses prior to the withdraw deadline. The earned grade in the course is awarded after the withdraw deadline.


    Withdrawal Grades for Individual Course Withdrawals: 
    A course is unregistered during the drop/add period for a student who maintains enrollment in one or more course. Courses dropped after the drop/add period but prior to the withdraw deadline are issued a grade of W (Withdrawal). The earned grade in the course is awarded after the withdraw deadline.

    A grade of W* is recorded for Pass/Fail courses (campus credits) dropped after the drop/add period or for courses being withdrawn during an LOA period. The W* may also be used in rare instances when a correction needs made to a student’s schedule based on a documented issue. A grade of NA is recorded for module-based courses that are dropped after drop/add but prior to the start of the module in which the course was scheduled. W grades count as credits attempted but not earned for the purposes of calculating the pace in academic progress and are excluded from CGPA. W* and NA grades are excluded from both the CGPA and Pace components of SAP.

    Incomplete Grades:
    Incomplete grades count as credits/hours attempted but not completed. When the Incomplete is converted to a letter grade, it will be computed as credits/hours completed or failed, depending on the grade assigned.

    Retake Program:
    Beginning in September 2017, a new Non Degree Seeking (NDS) Program was implemented as an intervention for students not meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Standards prior to a second or subsequent Re-entry.  Students may be required to repeat one or more courses until their Cumulative GPA (CGPA) meets the 2.0 standard.  The student must take one course at a time, at a nominal cost as defined in the charges section of this catalog.  Passing attempts are then treated as repeat coursework consistent with the repeat coursework section of the SAP policy.  Any failed or withdrawn attempts will not be counted against the student’s pace or CGPA. This program may also be used for students struggling to maintain SAP as a condition of an appeal approval.

     

    Repeated Coursework

    A student’s enrollment status in a term-based program for Title IV purposes may include previously passed coursework being repeated in the program, but may not include more than one repetition of a specific previously passed course.

    A student may also request to audit any course within their program version with their Director of Education.

     

    Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

    Miller-Motte College is committed to the privacy and security of students. Miller-Motte College’s Student Records Policy complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) which establishes students’ rights and institutions’ responsibilities regarding the privacy of education records. It provides guidelines for maintaining the confidentiality of education records and monitoring the release of information from those records.

    FERPA affords current and former students certain rights with the respect to their educational records. Students have the right to:

    1. Inspect and review their individual school records within 45 days of the written request. Students should contact the Registrar’s Office to determine the location of appropriate records and the procedure for reviewing such records.

    A student should submit a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. Request for student finance records go to the Financial Aid Office, and requests for other records to the Registrar’s Office. A Miller-Motte College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

    2. An amendment of records believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights. However, grades and course evaluations can be challenged only on the grounds that they are improperly recorded. Students requesting an amendment of records should submit a written, dated request to the Registrar’s Office and clearly identify the part of the record to be changed, and specify why it is inaccurate, misleading or a violation of privacy.

    If Miller-Motte College decides not to amend the record as requested, Miller-Motte College will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

    3. Consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without prior consent from the parents or eligible student as applicable. Students must provide a signed, dated and written request allowing Miller-Motte College to disclose the information. Students must state the records that may be disclosed, state the purpose of the disclosure, and identify the party to whom the disclosure may be made. NOTE: FERPA does authorize Miller-Motte College to disclose student personally identifiable information without consent to other school officials, any contractor or consultant contracting with Miller-Motte College, representatives of the Secretary, the state, an organization conducting studies, accrediting agencies, a federal grand jury subpoena, etc.

    A Miller-Motte College official is a person employed by the school in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the school had contracted (such as an auditor, attorney or collection agency); a person serving on the Board of Directors, a student serving on an official committee (such as grievance or disciplinary committee) or assisting another school official in performing his/her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest, if he/she must review the education record in order to fulfill his/her official responsibilities.

    Upon request from the student or institution, Miller-Motte College may disclose education records without the student’s consent to officials of another school which the student seeks or intends to enroll.

    The school also reserves the right to release to police agencies and/or crime victims any records or information pertinent to a crime which has occurred on campus, including the details of and disciplinary action taken against the alleged perpetrator of the crime. 

    4. File a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Miller-Motte College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The requirements for filing a complaint and required form can be found at https://studentprivacy.ed.gov and the name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

            Family Policy Compliance Office (FERPA) 
            U.S. Department of Education 
            400 Maryland Avenue, SW 
            Washington, DC 40202-4605
            
    FERPA.Complaints@ed.gov

    5. Notify Miller-Motte College’s Education Office in writing if the student wishes to withhold his or her information from the “Directory” information. The school may release information without the student’s consent where the information is classified as “Directory Information.” The following categories of information have been designated by Miller-Motte College as directory information:

    • Name 
    • Address 
    • Telephone Listing 
    • E-mail address 
    • Photographs 
    • Major Field of Study 
    • Dates of Attendance 
    • Current classification and/or year in school 
    • Credit load 
    • Total number of credits completed 
    • Major and minor fields of study 
    • Awards and honors 
    • Degree(s) conferred (including dates) 
    • Commencement program 
    • Honors program

    Students who do not want such information released without their consent should notify the Education Office.

     

    Directed Study

    Courses are offered via directed study only when extraordinary circumstances warrant. Requests for directed study will be evaluated on a case-by case basis as determined by the Director of Education and/or the Program Director.  Directed study involves a high level of independence and self-direction on the part of the student to read, conduct research, and complete written examinations, reports, research papers, and similar assignments designed to measure the student’s grasp of the subject matter. Under the supervision of a faculty member, a learning contract shall be developed which outlines specific learning objectives, texts, supplemental readings, course requirements, evaluative criteria, and examination dates. Because directed study classes are the exception and not the rule, the number of courses that a student will be allowed to take in directed study will be limited.  In all cases, the directed study contract must demonstrate that the student receives an appropriate combination of instructional time and assignments to be completed outside of class to master the stated course objectives. The following factors will be carefully evaluated prior to granting a request for an independent study: 
    • The student’s grade point average;
    • The student’s proximity to graduation;
    • The existence of extenuating circumstances or hardships that prevent the student from taking the course on campus; and
    • The availability of distance-education sections of the course.
    The directed study should not be granted for the purpose of allowing a student to repeat a class he or she has failed or from which he or she has withdrawn.  The directed study should not be granted to fill a schedule or allow an easy transition back into school for a student who has withdrawn for one or more terms.
     

    The Externship Experience

    The externship is a course that is a requirement in designated programs.  Students participate in an externship during their final term or final modules.  Learning takes place “on the job” as students experience first-hand the day-to-day operations of their career field.  Supervised externships are customized to each student’s program area and capabilities.  Because it is an academic requirement, it requires oversight by academic staff members who are specialists in the career field.

    Prior to a student's beginning an externship, a completed Externship Agreement and Externship Assignment Form must be executed with Miller-Motte College, the externship site and the student . A copy of this information is maintained by the Externship Coordinator and Career Services Department and become part of the student’s permanent record.  The externship site and the student are also provided a general competency list for the student’s program that reflects the competencies acquired by the student. This provides guidance to the site supervisor on the student’s expected skill sets.

    The student submits weekly reports to document his/her externship attendance, activities and learning.  The sponsoring externship host evaluates the student at the mid-point and at the conclusion of the required hours. In addition, evaluations are made by the externship supervisor based on site visitation and observations.

    The Externship Coordinator makes a planned visit to the externship site to observe the student on the job.  The site supervisor is notified of the visit and is involved in communicating with the Externship Coordinator about the student’s progress.  Each student is visited at least once a term by an Externship Coordinator.  A second visit may be necessary if a student needs additional coaching or training, or at the request of the site.

    The Externship Coordinator completes and Externship Visit Form for each visit that is conducted. These visit reports are filed with the Director of Education.

    Students are required to provide their own transportation to and from the externship site.  Externship hours are generally scheduled during the day, but may include nights and weekends.
     

    Programs of Study

    The following programs of study are offered at Miller-Motte College:

    Associate of Applied Science
        • Surgical Technology

    Certificate
        • Esthetics Technology
        • Medical Billing and Coding

    Diploma
        • Massage Therapy
        • Medical Clinical Assistant

    Effective, July 1, 2011, all required program disclosure information regarding Miller-Motte College programs is available on line at http://disclosure.miller-motte.edu.

     

    Surgical Technology

    Associate of Applied Science

    Program Objective

    The Surgical Technology program provides training for an entry-level career as a vital member of the operating room team where the Surgical Technologist works together with surgeons, anesthesiologists, registered nurses, and other surgical team members. The program is designed to prepare competent entry-level surgical technologists in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. Surgical Technologists maintain asepsis in the operating room, pass instruments and sterile items and equipment to the surgeon during a procedure, maintain the sterile field, and prepare patients, instruments, supplies, and equipment before and after an operation. Graduates may seek career opportunities in hospitals, surgical suites, or surgical centers as scrub surgical technologist, circulating surgical technologist, or second assisting technologist. Graduates of CAAHEP-accredited programs are eligible to sit for the national certification examination for Surgical Technology to become a Certified Surgical Technologist (CST).


     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     AHS1100Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, and Gastrointestinal Systems4
     AHS1200Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Blood, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems4
     AHS1300Nervous, Sensory, Endocrine, Urinary, and Reproductive Systems4
     GS285Microbiology4
     INT1108Practical Computer Applications4
     PSY1101Organizational Dynamics4
     SUR1113Pharmacology and Anesthesiology4
     SUR1114Pathophysiology4
     SUR1115Surgical Orientation4
     SUR1116Surgical Principles4
     SUR1117Surgical Techniques4
     SUR1230Minor Surgical Procedures4
     SUR1231Major Surgical Procedures4
     SUR1240Surgical Review4
     SUR1245Surgical Clinical Practicum I8
     SUR1246Surgical Clinical Practicum II8
     Total72

     General Education RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     COM1101Interpersonal Communications4
     ENG1101English Composition I4
     MTH1101College Mathematics4
     PSY1103Introduction to Psychology4
     SOC1103Introduction to Sociology4
     Total20

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation92

    All student activities associated with the curriculum, especially while students are completing clinical rotations, will be educational in nature. Students will not be substituted for hired staff personnel within the clinical institution, in the capacity of a surgical technologist.

    Clinical Case Requirements
     

    1.     The number of cases required for graduation from the Surgical Technology Program is 120 cases (CCST6e, AST).

    2.     As per the Association of Surgical Technologists (AST), Core Curriculum for Surgical Technology 6th Edition, the following will apply:

    A.     General Surgery cases

    1.     Each student will be required to complete a minimum of 30 cases in General Surgery; 20 cases must be performed in the First Scrub Role. The remaining 10 cases may be performed in either the First or Second Scrub Role.

    B.    Specialty cases

    1.      Each student will complete a minimum of 90 cases in a variety of surgical specialties.  (CCST6e, AST) The following areas are considered Specialty: Cardiothoracic, ENT, Ophthalmic, GU, Neuro, OB/GYN, Oral/Maxillofacial, Orthopedics, Peripheral Vascular, Plastics, and Procurement/Transplant.

    a.      A minimum of 60 surgical specialty cases must be performed in the First Scrub Role and distributed amongst a minimum of four surgical specialties.

    1.      A maximum of 15 cases can be counted in any one surgical specialty.

    2.      The additional 20 cases in the First Scrub Role may be distributed amongst any one surgical specialty or multiple surgical specialties.

    b.    The remaining 30 surgical specialty cases may be performed in any surgical specialty either in the First or Second Scrub Role.

    C.    Optional surgical specialties

    1.     Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory. However, up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases.

    a.     Diagnostic endoscopy cases must be documented in the category of “Diagnostic Endoscopy”, rather than by specialty.

    b.    Vaginal delivery cases must be documented in the category of “Labor & Delivery” rather than in the OB/GYN specialty.

    3.     Case experience in the Second Scrub Role is not mandatory. All cases must be documented, including Observation Cases, but do not count towards the 120 required cases.

    4.      All students are required to monitor clinical progress on a daily basis. Cases will be counted according to surgical specialty. (CCST6e, AST)

     

    * Clinical Case requirements listed above apply to all new cohort starts meeting the requirements of the Core Curriculum for Surgical Technology, 6e (CCST6e).

    First and Second Scrub Role and Observation Definitions (CCST6e)

    First Scrub Role

    The Student surgical technologist shall perform the following duties during any given surgical procedure with proficiency. The following list is provided to identify the items that must be completed in order to document a case in the first scrub role. A student not meeting the five criteria below cannot count the case in the first scrub role and the case must be documented in the second scrub role or observation role.

    ·         Verify supplies and equipment needed for the surgical procedure.

    ·         Set up the sterile field with instruments, supplies, equipment, medication(s) and solutions needed for the procedure.

    ·         Perform counts with the circulator prior to the procedure and before the incision is closed.

    ·         Pass instruments and supplies to the sterile surgical team members during the procedure.

    ·         Maintain sterile technique as measured by recognized breaks in technique and demonstrate knowledge of how to correct with appropriate technique.

    Second Scrub Role

    The second scrub role is defined as the student who is at the sterile field who has not met all criteria for the first scrub role, but actively participates in the surgical procedure in its entirety by completing any of the following:

    ·         Sponging

    ·         Suctioning

    ·         Cutting suture

    ·         Holding retractors

    ·         Manipulating endoscopic camera

    Observation Role

    The observation role is defined as the student who is in the operating room performing roles that do not meet the criteria for the first or second scrub role. These observation cases are not to be included in the required case count, but must be documented by the program.


        
     

    Esthetics Technology

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The program objective is to give the student the knowledge necessary to develop manipulative skills for entry-level into the Esthetics profession and to help prepare graduates to qualify to sit for the North Carolina State Board licensing examination.  Course work includes instruction in professional development, bacteriology, sanitation, and disinfection, skin structure, diseases and disorders, facials, aromatherapy, body treatments, microdermabrasion, various phases of Esthetics technology, business/computer principles, product knowledge, and other selected topics. Upon successful completion of the North Carolina State Board licensing exam, graduates will be issued a license by the North Carolina State Board. Employment opportunities may include beauty salons, spas, dermatology offices and other related businesses as an esthetician, skin specialist, educator, platform artist, manufacturer’s representative, facial product salesperson, and more.



     Major & Related RequirementsClock Hours
     CO171Esthetics Laboratory160
     CO170Esthetics Technology I40
     CO172Esthetics Technology II40
     CO173Esthetics Technology III40
     CO174Esthetics Applications I200
     CO175Esthetics Review40
     CO176Esthetics Applications II200
     Total720

     Total Clock Hours Required for Graduation720

    This program is considered a clock-hour program for financial aid purposes.

    Students who successfully complete the Esthetics Technology program will be eligible for professional licensure once all the course, testing, and performance requirements have been met and are therefore adequately prepared to take the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art licensure examination. NOTE: The North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art requires training from a state approved program in order to be eligible for licensure in North Carolina. Individuals may be unable to obtain licensure in North Carolina if they have a misdemeanor or felony conviction. For additional information, contact the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art, 1201 Front Street, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27609; telephone: 919-733-4117.


        
     

    Medical Billing and Coding

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The Medical Billing and Coding program prepares graduates to work as entry-level medical billing specialists. Students receive training in standard medical procedure coding, insurances, reimbursements, healthcare standards, and information storage and retrieval systems. Graduates may seek entry-level employment in physician’s offices, clinics, laboratories, hospitals, group practices, specialty practices, health insurance offices, and nursing homes. The program helps prepare and encourages graduates to sit for a certification examination.


     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     AHS1100Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, and Gastrointestinal Systems4
     AHS1200Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Blood, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems4
     AHS1300Nervous, Sensory, Endocrine, Urinary, and Reproductive Systems4
     AHS1310Allied Health Orientation4
     AHS1400Pathology4
     AHS1420Pharmacology4
     AHS1520Medical Office Systems4
     AHS1650Medical Coding4
     AHS2150Medical Insurance Billing4
     INT1108Practical Computer Applications4
     MBC1324Health Information Systems and Technology4
     MBC1500Intermediate Coding4
     MBC2160Advanced Medical Coding4
     MBC2300Registries and Statistics4
     MBC2360Externship8
     MBC2500Coding Certification Preparation4
     PSY1101Organizational Dynamics4
     Total72

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation72

    Students completing the Medical Billing and Coding program are expected to complete MBC2360 Externship; however, students may complete MBC2361 Capstone under special circumstances (i.e. job conflict, medical reason) with approval of the Program Director and Director of Education. In most situations, students enrolled in residential, campus-based delivery will complete MBC2360.
        
     

    Massage Therapy

    Diploma

    Program Objective

    The Massage Therapy program provides training for an entry-level career as a professional massage therapist.  Students develop the knowledge necessary to develop massage protocol and perform an extensive therapeutic massage with focus on whole body wellness.  Graduates are prepared for employment opportunities in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, medical offices, spas, health clubs, and private practice and are eligible to sit for the National, state or MBLEX licensing exam.



     Major & Related RequirementsClock Hours
     MT160Massage Therapy Theory30
     MT165Anatomy & Physiology40
     MT180Swedish Massage80
     MT166Anatomy & Physiology II40
     MT169Somatic Psychology20
     MT175Kinesiology Upper Body50
     MT176Kinesiology Lower Body40
     MT181Massage Pathology50
     MT268Hydrotherapy & Aromatherapy50
     MT276Seated & Sports Massage60
     MT185Law Business and Ethics30
     MT269Spa Therapy60
     MT275Special Populations60
     MT190Student Clinic C40
     MT193Student Clinic E30
     MT272Therapeutic Massage50
     MT273Therapeutic Massage II40
     MT192Student Clinic D30
     MT194Student Clinic F40
     MT266Energy Based Modalities60
     Total900

     Total Clock Hours Required for Graduation900

    A student shall not receive a fee, tip or other consideration for the massage and bodywork therapy they perform while completing clinical requirements for graduation, whether or not the school charges a fee for services provided in a student clinic.

    Students who successfully complete the Massage Therapy program will be eligible for professional licensure once all the course and testing requirements have been met, and are therefore adequately prepared to take the Massage and Bodywork Licensure Exam (MBLEx). NOTE: The State of North Carolina requires training from a 500 hour state approved program and a passing score on a competency assessment examination that meets generally accepted psychometric principles and standards and is approved by the Board in order to be eligible for licensure in North Carolina. Individuals may be unable to obtain licensure in North Carolina if they have a misdemeanor or felony conviction. The NCBMBT reviews misdemeanor and felony convictions on a case-by-case basis.

    Additionally, individuals must also demonstrate satisfactory proof of proficiency in the English language in order to obtain licensure in the state of North Carolina.

    For additional information and an application for licensure, contact the North Carolina Board of Massage & Bodywork Therapy, PO Box 2539, Raleigh, NC 27602; telephone 919-546-0050. For a MBLEx candidate handbook or content outline, contact the Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards (FSMTB) at P.O. Box 198748, Nashville, TN 37219; telephone 866-962-3926; email mblex@fsmtb.org. Licensing and certification requirements may vary by state.

    The College makes no representation, promise, or guarantee that completion of this program assures either passage of any certification examination or acceptance by any state board. This program is not intended to prepare graduates for employment in any state other than North Carolina. Prospective and current students and graduates are responsible for researching and understanding all examination, registration, certification, or licensure requirements in any state in which they seek to become registered, licensed, or employed.


        
     

    Medical Clinical Assistant

    Diploma

    Program Objective

    The Medical Clinical Assistant program provides training for an entry-level career as an important member of the healthcare team. The program emphasizes hands-on experience in both front-office administrative and back-office clinical skills and develops traits employers seek such as the ability to assume responsibility, make decisions, and work independently.

    Medical Clinical Assistant students receive training in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. Graduates are eligible to sit for an examination that leads to a certification or registration in the medical field. Students should talk to the Program Director for more information about certification examinations. Graduates may pursue career opportunities in the growing healthcare industry in doctors’ offices, medical clinics, and other medical facilities as clinical medical assistants, administrative medical assistants, and medical office managers where they work under the supervision and direction of a physician or licensed healthcare practitioner.

    Program Outcomes:
    ● Sit for a national credentialing examination(s) for medical assisting.
    ● Demonstrate the skills necessary to support the provision of patient care.
    ● Demonstrate the skills related to effective communication in the medical setting, both orally
    and in writing.
    ● Demonstrate the skills required for the performance of medical business practice functions.
    ● Demonstrate the skills required to provide patient care in accordance with regulations,
    policies, laws and patient rights.
    ● Demonstrate the ability to apply quality control measures in following health and safety
    policies and procedures to prevent illness and injury.


     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     AHS1100Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, and Gastrointestinal Systems4
     AHS1200Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Blood, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems4
     AHS1300Nervous, Sensory, Endocrine, Urinary, and Reproductive Systems4
     AHS1310Allied Health Orientation4
     AHS1400Pathology4
     AHS1420Pharmacology4
     AHS1520Medical Office Systems4
     AHS1650Medical Coding4
     AHS2150Medical Insurance Billing4
     INT1108Practical Computer Applications4
     MAA1410Clinical Foundations4
     MAA1500Clinical Specialties4
     MAA1600Clinical Laboratory4
     MAA1700Extern and Medical Review8
     Total60

     General Education RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     COM1101Interpersonal Communications4
     ENG1101English Composition I4
     MTH1101College Mathematics4
     Total12

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation72


        
     

    Course Descriptions

    Course Numbering System

    The course numbering system is a series of letters which identify course subject areas followed by a series of numbers that identify course level:
    AHS
     Medical
    CO
     Cosmetology
    COM
     Communications
    ENG
     English
    GS
     General Studies
    INT
     Information Technology
    MAA
     Medical
    MBC
     Medical
    MT
     Massage Therapy
    MTH
     Mathematics
    PSY
     Psychology
    SOC
     Sociology
    SUR
     Surgical Technology
       
    The first number of the three digits indicates the level of the course:
    0 Preparatory courses
    1 Normally a first-year course
    2 Normally a second-year course
       
    Additional courses identified as General Education Courses by the North Carolina Board of Governors are designated by #; General Education Courses are designated by **; General Studies Designation: Humanities/Fine Arts are designated by [H/FA]; General Studies Designation: Natural Science/Mathematics are designated by [NS/M]; General Studies Designation: Social/Behavioral Science are designated by [S/BS]; Online Only - Bachelor Level Class are designated by @

    Individual courses are approved to run online. Please see the Director of Education for a list of available online courses.

    Prerequisites and course hours are identified at the end of the course description:
    (AA-BB-CC-DD, E) at the ending of each course description where AA is Lecture hours, BB is Lab hours, CC is Externship Hours, DD is Outside Hours, and E is Total Quarter Credit Hours
       
     Medical (AHS)

    AHS1100 Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, and Gastrointestinal Systems 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will undertake a system-by-system anatomical study of the human body and basic principles of physiology. This course will cover the structure; functions; and conditions/diseases of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and gastrointestinal systems. In addition, the medical terminology applicable to these body systems will be addressed, with emphasis on word construction, proper usage, and acceptable medical abbreviations. (40-0-0-80, 4)

    AHS1200 Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Blood, Lymphatic, and Immune Systems 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will undertake a system-by-system anatomical study of the human body and basic principles of physiology. This course will cover the structure; functions; and conditions/diseases of the respiratory, cardiovascular, blood, lymphatic, and immune systems. In addition, the medical terminology applicable to these body systems will be addressed, with emphasis on word construction, proper usage, and acceptable medical abbreviations. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 ) (40-0-0-80, 4)

    AHS1300 Nervous, Sensory, Endocrine, Urinary, and Reproductive Systems 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will undertake a system-by-system anatomical study of the human body and basic principles of physiology. This course will cover the structure; functions; and conditions/diseases of the nervous, sensory, endocrine, urinary, and reproductive systems. In addition, the medical terminology applicable to these body systems will be addressed, with emphasis on word construction, proper usage, and acceptable medical abbreviations. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 ) (40-0-0-80, 4)

    AHS1310 Allied Health Orientation 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course will introduce allied health students to various roles of medical professionals. Student will be trained in scope of practice, legal and ethical responsibilities, and governmental compliance required within allied health professions. Prerequisite: None (40-0-0-80, 4)

    AHS1400 Pathology 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    The course examines the disease process for all body systems as well as how each disease process affects the body as a whole. Student will learn proper methods to successfully educate patients and their family members on the disease process, prevention and health maintenance. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 And AHS1200 ) Corequisite(s): ( AHS1300 ) (40-0-0-80, 4)

    AHS1420 Pharmacology 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This foundational class discusses the most commonly prescribed medications in the healthcare field. Students review the key drug classifications necessary to understand the relationships between the disease process and medications. Topics include: medication terminology, indications, effects and interactions, toxicity, and patient education. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 And AHS1200 And AHS1300 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    AHS1520 Medical Office Systems 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides a working knowledge of the administrative and financial duties performed in the medical office setting, including the utilization of Electronic Health Records (EHR). Students learn to organize and plan assigned tasks, set priorities, and make decisions as a member of the healthcare team. Prerequisite(s): ( INT1108 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    AHS1650 Medical Coding 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides the primary skills needed for medical procedural and diagnostic coding. Emphasis is placed on the use of coding manuals to assign diagnostic and procedural codes for the medical billing process. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 And AHS1200 ) Corequisite(s): ( AHS1300 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    AHS2150 Medical Insurance Billing 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will explain the guidelines of Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs), Traditional Insurance, Group Plans, Individual Plans and Government Sponsored Plans. Students will learn about completing CMS1500 Claim Forms, and processing and billing insurance claims. Methods of pre-certification, pre-authorization and referrals will also be examined. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1650 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

     Cosmetology (CO)

    CO170 Esthetics Technology I 40 Clock Hours
    This course introduces basic esthetic technology concepts. Topics include orientation, professional image and development, hygiene, ethics, sanitation, sterilization, bacteriology, safety, first aid, physiology and histology of the skin, skin analysis, product selection and ingredients, client consultation, basic facials, body treatments, aromatherapy, massage, superfluous hair removal, color analysis, makeup applications and other related topics. (40-0-0-0)

    CO171 Esthetics Laboratory 160 Clock Hours
    This course provides practical experience on mannequins of the concepts introduced in CO170. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate introductory esthetics technology concepts on live models in a simulated salon setting. (0-160-0-0)

    CO172 Esthetics Technology II 40 Clock Hours
    This course covers intermediate esthetics technology concepts and techniques. Topics include safety, anatomy and physiology, chemistry for estheticians, skin disorders and diseases, machine facials, electricity, apparatus, advanced esthetic services, makeup, product knowledge, and other related topics. Prerequisite(s): ( CO170 ) (40-0-0-0)

    CO173 Esthetics Technology III 40 Clock Hours
    This course covers more comprehensive esthetics technology concepts, techniques, and an in depth view of the salon business. Topics include the business side of the beauty industry, job search, professional relationships, salon ownership and retailing. Mock business situations, such as inventory and ordering, designing a salon, appointment setting, promotion and marketing, retail sales, calculating wages, customer relations and basic computer applications will be discussed. The State Board Rules and Regulations and an overview of all Esthetics Technology concepts and applications will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ( CO172 Or CO172 ) (40-0-0-0)

    CO174 Esthetics Applications I 200 Clock Hours
    This course provides an introductory practical experience on live models with the concepts introduced in CO171 in a simulated salon setting. Emphasis is placed on an intermediate level of esthetic concepts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of intermediate concepts of esthetics and competently demonstrate esthetic services on live models in a salon setting. (0-0-200-0)

    CO175 Esthetics Review 40 Clock Hours
    This course provides an extensive overview of the state board rules and regulations. It also provides a review of all esthetic concepts and applications in preparation for the licensing exam. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the laws that govern esthetics and demonstrate competence in a mock State Board setting. Prerequisite(s): ( CO173 Or CO173 ) (40-0-0-0)

    CO176 Esthetics Applications II 200 Clock Hours
    This course provides an advanced experience in a simulated salon setting. Emphasis is placed on efficient and competent delivery of all esthetic services on clients in preparation for the licensing examination and employment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in program requirements and the areas covered on the licensing examination for estheticians. Prerequisite(s): ( CO174 ) (0-0-200-0)

     Communications (COM)

    COM1101 Interpersonal Communications **4 Quarter Credit Hours
    The principles of effective verbal and non-verbal communication are the focus of this course. Students are given the opportunity to learn and apply communication techniques based on content, context, and audience. Prerequisite: None. (40-0-0-80, 4)

     English (ENG)

    ENG1101 English Composition I **4 Quarter Credit Hours
    In this course, students learn about the context of writing and are given the opportunity to practice their personal writing skills. Elements of this course include awareness of audience, understanding of the writing process and elements of grammar and style, and critical reading and document writing. Overall, students are expected to learn about writing and its function within practical contexts. (40-0-0-80, 4)

     General Studies (GS)

    GS285 Microbiology 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    A survey of topics in microbiology as they relate to the care of patients and protection against infectious disease. They include classification of organisms, parasitology, biotechnology, and infection control. (30-20-0-70, 4)

     Information Technology (INT)

    INT1108 Practical Computer Applications 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides practical computer and general administrative skills required to utilize the computer as a tool in an office or clinical environment. Students will gain confidence in the use of the internet, productivity software, and associated computer hardware and software. The course will utilize several projects to reinforce the functionality and flexibility of the computer. (30-20-0-60, 4)

     Medical (MAA)

    MAA1410 Clinical Foundations 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This competency-based course focuses on the clinical medical assisting skills required to prepare the patient for examination and to assist the physician during patient examination and treatment. Infection control and safety and AIDS-related precautions are stressed. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 And AHS1200 And AHS1300 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    MAA1500 Clinical Specialties 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This competency based course teaches the skills necessary to perform selected diagnostic procedures used in general medicine and specialty physician offices to include assisting with surgical procedures, specialty examination, medication administration, allergy testing, electrocardiography, respiratory testing, wound care, catheterization assisting patients prepare for diagnostic imaging studies. Risk management, HIPAA, infection control, safety and blood borne pathogen precautions are stressed. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 And AHS1200 And AHS1300 And MAA1410 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    MAA1600 Clinical Laboratory 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This competency based course teaches the skills necessary for the performance of selected laboratory procedures. Students will learn phlebotomy techniques, capillary sticks, microscopic examination skills, gram staining procedures, urinalysis testing, and various laboratory-testing procedures performed in the physician's office. Students will practice how to obtain samples for testing and how to follow up patient test results. Risk management, quality control, HIPAA, infection control, safety, and AIDS-related precautions are stressed. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1100 And AHS1200 And AHS1300 And MAA1410 And MAA1500 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    MAA1700 Extern and Medical Review 8 Quarter Credit Hours
    The course provides students with the opportunity to practice administrative and clinical skills in a suitable physician's office or ambulatory health care facility under the supervision of the practicum coordinator and site preceptor. Preparation for and review of information on the national certification exam. Prerequisite(s): Final term or permission of Program Director (20-0-180-40, 8)

    MBC1324 Health Information Systems and Technology 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides an in-depth study of the content, storage, retrieval, control, and retention of health information systems. Information regarding hardware and software components of computers for medical record applications is discussed. Students will explore methods of controlling accuracy and security of data in computer systems, records linkage, and data sharing concepts. Prerequisite(s): ( INT1108 Or INT1108 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    MBC1500 Intermediate Coding 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides an in-depth study of coding and guidelines with emphasis on physician billing and regulatory requirements. Students will apply correct coding systems and nomenclatures using health records, case studies, and federal regulations regarding methods of reimbursement. Ethical decision making will also be covered. Prerequisite(s): ( AHS1650 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    MBC2160 Advanced Medical Coding 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides an advanced study of coding and guidelines. Students will assign CPT, ICD-10-CM, and Level II (HCPCS) diagnostic and procedural codes. Prerequisite(s): ( MBC1500 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    MBC2300 Registries and Statistics 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course explains the use of indexes, registers, and registries maintained by health care facilities and state and federal agencies. Students will learn how statistics are computed within the Health Information Management (HIM) departments in terms of unit cost, productivity, and staffing levels. They will be able to explain how these statistics are utilized in the creation of the department budget. Prerequisite(s): ( INT1108 ) (40-0-0-80, 4)

    MBC2360 Externship 8 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will be assigned to a suitable facility focusing on the application of basic coding and classification system guidelines and application of health information system theory under the supervision of the externship coordinator and site. Student will be required to participate in class discussions. Prerequisite(s): Final term or permission of Program Director (20-0-180-40, 8)

    MBC2361 Capstone 8 Quarter Credit Hours
    The Capstone course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the goals and objectives for the Medical Billing and Coding (MBC) or Electronic Health Records (EHR) Program. Students will demonstrate their knowledge and skills by completing a major project or engaging in a research project. Prerequisite(s): Final term or permission of Program Director (0-0-0-0, 8)

    MBC2500 Coding Certification Preparation 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    The goal of this course is to help prepare students to take the coding licensure examination. It includes a review of concepts such as: applying coding guidelines, analyzing health records, validating Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs), applying reimbursement methodologies, and complying with ethical standards. In addition, the course will also cover test taking skills and strategies and applying these strategies to entry-level professional licensing examinations. As a part of the course, the student will schedule to sit for the appropriate examination. Prerequisite(s): ( MBC2160 ) (40-0-0-80, 4)

     Massage Therapy (MT)

    MT160 Massage Therapy Theory 30 Clock Hours
    This course introduces students to the massage profession and the fundamentals of massage therapy techniques. Students will examine the historical development of massage and study basic principles of massage therapy including indications, contraindications, duration, and energy theory. Holism and self-care will be taught and discussed. Massage effects on pain and various body systems will be discussed. Students are introduced to the major movements and concepts of massage therapy. Client evaluation, draping, hygiene, and safe sanitary practices are introduced. (30-0-0-0)

    MT165 Anatomy & Physiology 40 Clock Hours
    Students will study the structural systems of the human body and the principles of human physiology. The design of this course is to assist the student in understanding body organization at different levels, the importance of the body's chemical constituents and processes, the organ systems involved with support and movement, and how these organ systems work together to maintain homeostasis. It includes the study of structure, function, and related conditions and diseases of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. This course will utilize both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to achieve course objectives. (40-0-0-0)

    MT166 Anatomy & Physiology II 40 Clock Hours
    This course is a study of the structural systems of the human body and the principles of human physiology. This course will assist the student in understanding body organization at different levels, the importance of the body's chemical constituents and processes, and how the various organ systems work together to maintain homeostasis. It includes the study of structure, function, and related conditions and diseases of the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems.maintain homeostasis. It includes the study of structure, function, and related conditions and diseases of the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. (40-0-0-0)

    MT169 Somatic Psychology 20 Clock Hours
    Somatic Psychology introduces the mind/body connection, posture analysis, and motor/sensory amnesia. (20-0-0-0)

    MT175 Kinesiology Upper Body 50 Clock Hours
    This course is an in-depth study of musculoskeletal and neurological systems and how they work in conjunction with each other. Emphasis is placed on the upper body: head, neck, arm and hand. (30-20-0-0)

    MT176 Kinesiology Lower Body 40 Clock Hours
    This course is an-in depth study of musculoskeletal and neurological systems and how they work in conjunction with each other. Emphasis is placed on the trunk and lower body: pelvis, thigh, leg and foot. (20-20-0-0)

    MT180 Swedish Massage 80 Clock Hours
    The major techniques of massage therapy are put together in the massage laboratory into hour massage routines. Proper draping techniques, range of motion and proper body mechanics are stressed and put together into routines. Concepts of intentional touch and grounding will be put into practice. The importance of rhythm and correct pressure will be developed. Corequisite(s): ( MT160AND MT165 ) (40-40-0-0)

    MT181 Massage Pathology 50 Clock Hours
    This course provides a general overview of the disease process and the mechanisms by which the human body copes with disease. Also included are surveys of the more common diseases affecting various body systems and discussions of diseases of the endocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, urinary and reproductive systems. Students study basic medical terminology encountered by massage therapists. Prerequisite(s): ( MT166 And MT165 ) (30-20-0-0)

    MT185 Law Business and Ethics 30 Clock Hours
    This course introduces students to state massage law, rules, and regulations and discusses ethical issues, rules of conduct, and professional responsibilities of massage therapists. Communication skills, personal hygiene and health habits will be discussed. The operation of a massage enterprise will be explored through the integration of basic business practices, marketing strategies, financial management, and record keeping requirements. Supplemental business opportunities will be explored. (10-20-0-0)

    MT190 Student Clinic C 40 Clock Hours
    Students perform a minimum of 40 hours in the school's massage teaching clinic under the supervision of a licensed massage therapist. Students will interact with clinic clients from the community as if they were at a private facility and will perform a minimum of 15 massage services. In preparation for the real-life experience of managing a massage business, students will interview clients, discuss massage needs, perform therapeutic services, and maintain SOAP notes on the services performed. Students will also gain experience on the practical side of a massage therapy practice by making, confirming, and canceling appointments, maintaining client files, and keeping records. Students receive no compensation or fees for their work while completing these clinical graduation requirements. (0-0-40-0)

    MT192 Student Clinic D 30 Clock Hours
    Students perform a minimum of 30 hours in the school's massage teaching clinic under the supervision of a licensed massage therapist. Students will interact with clinic clients from the community as if they were at a private facility and will perform a minimum of 12 massage services. In preparation for the real-life experience of managing a massage business, students will interview clients, discuss massage needs, perform therapeutic services, and maintain SOAP notes on the services performed. Students will also gain experience on the practical side of a massage therapy practice by making, confirming, and canceling appointments, maintaining client files, and keeping records. Students receive no compensation or fees for their work while completing these clinical graduation requirements. (0-0-30-0)

    MT193 Student Clinic E 30 Clock Hours
    Students perform a minimum of 30 hours in the school's massage teaching clinic under the supervision of a licensed massage therapist. Students will interact with clinic clients from the community as if they were at a private facility and will perform a minimum of 12 massage services. In preparation for the real-life experience of managing a massage business, students will interview clients, discuss massage needs, perform therapeutic services, and maintain SOAP notes on the services performed. Students will also gain experience on the practical side of a massage therapy practice by making, confirming, and canceling appointments, maintaining client files, and keeping records. Students receive no compensation or fees for their work while completing these clinical graduation requirements (0-0-30-0)

    MT194 Student Clinic F 40 Clock Hours
    Students perform a minimum of 40 hours in the school's massage teaching clinic under the supervision of a licensed massage therapist. Students will interact with clinic clients from the community as if they were at a private facility and will perform a minimum of 15 massage services. In preparation for the real-life experience of managing a massage business, students will interview clients, discuss massage needs, perform therapeutic services, and maintain SOAP notes on the services performed. Students will also gain experience on the practical side of a massage therapy practice by making, confirming, and canceling appointments, maintaining client files, and keeping records. Students receive no compensation or fees for their work while completing these clinical graduation requirements. Assist the student in preparing for the state licensure examination. (0-0-40-0)

    MT266 Energy Based Modalities 60 Clock Hours
    This course introduces students to the philosophy of energy-based bodywork modalities. The five-element theory is explored. The concept of energy meridians is explained. Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shiatsu, Thai Traditional Massage, Craniosacral Therapy, reflexology, and other energy-based modalities are introduced and explored. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (36-24-0-0)

    MT268 Hydrotherapy & Aromatherapy 50 Clock Hours
    Hydrotherapy and aromatherapy are the external use of water in all its forms (steam, liquid and ice) and essential oils, as well as, complementary agents (e.g. herbs and salt). Students learn how to apply moist heat, contrast therapies, and a variety of cold applications for therapeutic purposes. Aromatherapy is the controlled use of essential oils to help bring into balance one's physical and mental health. Students evaluate the type of modality most appropriate in varying therapeutic situations. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (20-30-0-0)

    MT269 Spa Therapy 60 Clock Hours
    Spa therapies are specialized therapeutic body treatments used for adjunctive treatments with massage. Spa treatments include: paraffin body wax, salt glows, and various body wraps. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (30-30-0-0)

    MT272 Therapeutic Massage 50 Clock Hours
    This course introduces the student to therapeutic massage. Topics include deep tissue massage, trigger point, and neuromuscular therapy. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (30-20-0-0)

    MT273 Therapeutic Massage II 40 Clock Hours
    This course is a continuation of Therapeutic Massage. Emphasis is on application of concepts learned in Therapeutic Massage: deep tissue massage, trigger point therapy, and neuromuscular therapy. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (0-40-0-0)

    MT275 Special Populations 60 Clock Hours
    Special populations include those who require alternate massage techniques from the basic Swedish massage such as pregnant women, infants, geriatric clients, and people with certain dysfunction. This course explores how to perform massage on people with special massage needs and encourages the student to develop an awareness of those qualities required to operate a successful practice incorporating special populations. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (20-40-0-0)

    MT276 Seated & Sports Massage 60 Clock Hours
    The modality of seated massage will be taught. Discussions of sports massage will include information applicable to working with both professional and amateur athletes. Pre-event and post-event massage will be addressed as well as the maintenance application of sports massage. Prerequisite(s): ( MT160 And MT180 ) (20-40-0-0)

     Mathematics (MTH)

    MTH1101 College Mathematics **4 Quarter Credit Hours
    The topics of this course cover the practical use of math through the number system, integers, algebraic expressions, graphs and data, and basic geometric principles. (40-0-0-80, 4)

     Psychology (PSY)

    PSY1101 Organizational Dynamics 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course introduces students to concepts that cover the interaction between individuals and groups. Topics focus on behavior, relationships, and influence in such common groups as family and workplace organizations. Emphasis is placed on personal analysis of motivators, taking charge of needs fulfillment, and planning for change. Prerequisite: None. (40-0-0-80, 4)

    PSY1103 Introduction to Psychology **4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course examines the scientific study of human behavior. Emphasis is on the historical standpoint, theoretical concepts, and empirical research that are used to describe and understand behavior from biological, cognitive, affective, and social perspectives. Prerequisite: None. (40-0-0-80, 4)

     Sociology (SOC)

    SOC1103 Introduction to Sociology **4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides an overview of the study of society. Topics include socialization; culture; social structure; social institutions, including family, religion, politics, and laws; social stratification; diversity; and deviance. Prerequisite: None. (40-0-0-80, 4)

     Surgical Technology (SUR)

    SUR1113 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    The identification of drugs used in the perioperative setting, their sources, classifications, routes, methods of use, side effects and interactions will be emphasized. Terminology, abbreviations, and calculations relating to pharmaceuticals will be introduced. Skills will be acquired in preparation and management of medications used for the surgical patient. Laws, regulations, scope of practice, and the ethical standards necessary for the administration and dispensing of drugs in the perioperative setting is explained and demonstrated. Topics covered in Anesthesia concepts include methods, agents, and techniques. The application of knowledge of homeostasis includes explanations of anesthesia monitoring devices, preparation, complications, and interventions. Prerequisite(s): ( MTH1101 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    SUR1114 Pathophysiology 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course provides a general overview of the disease process and the mechanisms by which the human body copes with disease. It provides the learner with an understanding of the essential concepts of various diseases affecting each body system and the mechanisms, progression and treatments for those diseases. The process of hemodynamic disorders, inflammation, and infection are included to provide an understanding of the relationship of all disorders as they relate to surgical intervention. (40-0-0-80, 4)

    SUR1115 Surgical Orientation 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This introductory course provides an orientation for students to the history of surgical technology, the surgical team members, hospital management, and the physical aspects of the operating room. Basic patient care concepts and issues concerning ethical, moral, and legal responsibilities are addressed. Classroom instruction and field trips to affiliate hospital facilities introduce students to the surgical technology field. (40-0-0-80, 4)

    SUR1116 Surgical Principles 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students are introduced to disinfection, decontamination, and sterilization standards and practices in the operating room setting. Basic patient care, aseptic technique, preoperative routines such as transporting, transferring, and positioning the patient, instrumentation, surgical preparation, draping, urinary catheterization and other surgical support measures related to the care of the surgical patient are the primary topics of this course. Emphasis is placed on applying the principles of aseptic techniques, environmental hazards, and infection control in the surgical field. Successful placement into this course determines the student cohort for reporting purposes. Prerequisite(s): ( SUR1115 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    SUR1117 Surgical Techniques 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course is structured to enhance the students' knowledge of anesthesia and surgical pharmacology and the concepts pertaining to patient care, medications, anesthetics, drug calculations and the legal policies and responsibilities they entail. Surgical technique incorporates preoperative, intraoperatve, and postoperative case planning/implementation which includes sutures, suturing devices, counts, wounds with regard to drains and dressings, tissue handling, and the care of specimens. Prerequisite(s): ( ST116 ) (30-20-0-50, 4)

    SUR1230 Minor Surgical Procedures 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students integrate acquired knowledge and skills with the basic surgical and diagnostic procedures in an operating room suite. This course is designed to further enhance the student's knowledge of minor surgical and diagnostic procedures in an operating room suite while involving students in clinical simulations. Prerequisite(s): ( SUR1117 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    SUR1231 Major Surgical Procedures 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students integrate acquired knowledge and skills with the major surgical procedures in an operating room suite. This course is designed to further enhance the student's knowledge of complex surgical procedures in an operating room suite while involving students in clinical simulations. Prerequisite(s): ( SUR1230 ) (30-20-0-60, 4)

    SUR1240 Surgical Review 4 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course assists the student in preparing for the Surgical Technology Certification Examination. Material covered in the surgical technology program is reviewed along with sample questions comparable to those asked on the certification exam. Prerequisite(s): ( SUR1231 ) (40-80-0-0, 4)

    SUR1245 Surgical Clinical Practicum I 8 Quarter Credit Hours
    The student has the opportunity to demonstrate a working knowledge of the skills required of a surgical technologist to function during minor cases under the supervision of a preceptor in the scrub role in a state-approved health care facility. The student receives no remuneration during this practicum experience. Prerequisite(s): ( SUR1231 ) (10-0-210-0, 8)

    SUR1246 Surgical Clinical Practicum II 8 Quarter Credit Hours
    The student has the opportunity to demonstrate a working knowledge of the skills required of a surgical technologist to function during major cases under the supervision of a preceptor in the scrub role in a state-approved health care facility. The student receives no remuneration during this practicum experience. Prerequisite(s): ( SUR1231 ) (10-0-210-0, 8)
     

    Organization, Faculty & Staff

     

    Organization

    Miller-Motte College is an independent, co-educational, postsecondary institution and is owned and operated by STVT-AAI Education Inc., a Texas corporation with headquarters located in Hurst, Texas. The affairs of the school are managed by the governing board and the Executive Director. The address of the corporate office is 8701 Bedford Euless Road, Suite 400, Hurst, TX 76053, telephone number 682-334-5605, email address questions@ancoraeducation.com. The website of the principal corporate office is: www.ancoraeducation.com.


    GOVERNANCE

    Board of Directors of STVT-AAI Education Inc.

    William Hansen

    Pete Kirchof

    Michael Williams

    Andrew Milgram

    Daniel Ducote Jr.

    Stephanie Nellons-Paige

    Aron Schwartz

    Michael Zawisky

     

    Administrative Staff

    Eric Ellis
    Executive Director
    Tomeka Clarke
    Career Services Advisor
    Andrea Cook
    Librarian
    Jill Creech 
    Administrative Assistant
    Deborah DiLalla
    Registrar
    Dawn Young 
    Education Manager
    Ann Partin
    Admissions Representative
    Melissa Rowland
    Director of Career Services
    Crystal Selvidge
    Financial Services Officer
    Marta Sosa
    Admissions Representative
    Mark Staehle
    Director of Student Services
     

    Faculty

    Charla Austin, LMBT
    Diploma, Massage Therapy, Miller-Motte College
    BA, Multidisciplinary Studies, North Carolina State University
    (Massage Therapy)
    Karla Best
    Diploma, Massage Therapy, Miller-Motte College
    Certificate, Esthetics, Miller-Motte College
    (Esthetics)
    Robin Blackwood
    Certificate, Esthetics, Miller-Motte College
    (Esthetics)
    Victoria Blue
    MHA, Healthcare Administration, Ashford University
    BA, Social Science, Education, Ashford University
    AAS, Surgical Technology, Miller-Motte College
    (Medical)
    Hiren Darji
    B.S.B., Montclair State University
    B.H.H.S., American University of Antigua
    M.D., Avalon University School of Medicine
    (Medical)
    Tralanda Davis
    MS, Adult Education Learning Organization Performance, Drake University
    BA, Sociology/ Liberal Arts, Grandview University
    Certificate, Surgical Technology, Mercy College of Health Sciences
    (Surgical Technology)
    Tonda Dawson
    AAS., Medical Administration
    (Medical)
    Kristen De’Leon
    LMBT# 14503
    Diploma, Massage Therapy, Miller-Motte College
    (Massage Therapy)
    Jeanette DeLuca
    Certificate, Esthetics Technology, Miller-Motte College
    Certificate, Esthetics Instructor, Miller-Motte College
    (Esthetics)
    Imane Elghazouani
    E#15583
    Certificate, Esthetics Technology, Miller­-Motte College 
    (Esthetics Technology)
    Heather Evans
    Associates in Arts, Cape Fear Community College 
    Associates in Applied Science, Surgical Technology, Miller- Motte College
    (Surgical Technology)
    Brenda Grubb
    B.S., Biology, East Carolina University
    PhD, Genetics, George Washington University
    (Medical)
    Olga Hardy
    M.S., Education/English Literature
    B.A., American Literature
    (English)
    Trisha Cusson Linebarger
    ET#2287
    Certificate, Esthetics Technology, Miller-Motte College
    (Esthetics Technology)
    Crystal Nicholson-Springer
    MS PH, Maternal & Child Health, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health
    MD, Medicine, University of Buffalo School of Medicine
    BS, Biology, City College of CUNY
    (Medical)
    Asma Sayeed
    M.B.B.S., Dow University of Health Sciences
    (Medical)
    Mellonie Smith
    MBA (In progress), Forbes School of Business and Technology, Ashford University
    BA, Healthcare Administration, Ashford University
    CST, Florida Community College of Jacksonville
    (Surgical Technology)
    Tia Teasley
    E#5330
    Certificate, Esthetics Technology, Miller-­Motte College 
    (Esthetics Technology)
    Dianne Willett, LMBT
    AA, General, Santa Fe Community College
    Diploma, Massage Therapy, Magnolia Institute for Health & Healing
    (Massage Therapy)
    Anthony Witherspoon
    B.S., Biology, Jackson State University
    D.C., Doctor of Chiropractic, Sherman College of Chiropractic
    (Medical)